An extra £25 on your State Pension? Okay then!

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This week the Government opened the doors on its new State Pension top up scheme, meaning millions of people could buy up to £25 a week on their State Pension.

Before you get too excited, the scheme is only available for people who reach State Pension age before 6 April 2016. So if you’re reading this and you’re a woman under 62 or a man under 64 then topping up isn’t for you, but it could be right for your parents or older friends and family. And on the plus side, you’re still young!

How does it work? It’s simple. You pay a lump sum and start receiving between £1 to £25 a week from your next State Pension payment. The amount you pay depends on how old you are and how much you want to get back. You’ll get your weekly payment for the rest of your life, and it will rise with inflation. Then your wife or husband can inherit it from you.

HERE IS AN EXAMPLE:

If you’re a 65 year old man and you want to top up your State Pension by £10 a week, you’ll need to pay £8,900. Or if you wait until your 66th birthday then it’s £8,710.

If you’re a 70 year old woman and want to top up by £1 a week, you’ll need to pay £779. Or if you want to get the full £25 a week, you’ll need to pay £19,475.

As you can see, the amounts change depending on your age and how much you want to get back.

The best way to find out how much you could top up by is to use the State Pension top up calculator at www.gov.uk/state-pension-topup

We spoke to Philip Morgan, 66, who is semi-retired from the entertainment industry and lives in Brighton, about why he plans to top up: “If you’ve got a certain amount of available money, it’s hard to imagine something that could be much better in terms of secure income.”

“When my father died he left me some money, so I’m interested in topping up because I want to turn that into a guaranteed income.”

Topping up suits Philip’s wife too: “The fact that some of the income can be inherited by my wife is really important.”

As always, it’s a good idea to look at your other options first and make sure you’ve got a full record. Philip says “I looked at if I needed to fill any gaps in my record first, but luckily I was fully paid up so I am getting the full State Pension anyway.”

The scheme closes on 5 April 2017, so there’s lots of time to think about it.

To apply now, visit: www.gov.uk/statepensiontopup

To register for updates, send an email to:[email protected]

Are you or anyone you know going to top up?

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budgieblues
2nd Oct 2016
0
Thanks for voting!
I personally cant see why anyone would want to do this.If you have that kind of money in your bank look for an investment bond or something where you can retrieve the money if need be.With the top up your pension idea if you die tomorrow its lost and all you are doing is topping up the government coffers,
Jackie Waters
29th Oct 2015
0
Thanks for voting!
Additional payments up front is a big decision and what a government guarantees today is not always what you get tomorrow. A clear example of this is if you are a women born in the 50s you probably already know have been worked over all ways pensionwise!
If like me you are a 1954 born woman then you got the worst of a very short straw draw.
"Sisters" born 1 year 4 months earlier than us get their pension 4 years earlier than us.
Double whammy , when we finally do get our pension they reduce it if we have any contracted out years despite having in total more than the 35 years qualifying N.I. contributions...they conveniently count the contracted out ones first and stop counting when they get to 35 - ( keeps payouts down , helps the coffers, sod you, you know the drill by now...if they can do you out of money they will....)
Well, if you don't want to take this without a fight there is a growing movement of women lobbying their M.P.s on these issues..
To find out more check out the W.A.S.P.I Facebook page
You may be interested in signing this petition
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/110776
tigreisis
19th Oct 2015
1
Thanks for voting!
The government did something similar 30 years ago, asking people to opt out and adding there contributions from paye to independent finance companies.
My husband did, and now, apparently we've found out that this was stopped and they have told him he is missing 6years of pension funds and can't retire till after 70. This is just another government farce.
dragon27
21st Nov 2015
0
Thanks for voting!
The same has happened to me i retire in two years time and have just had an estimate from the government. They have deducted £38 per week stating that i opted out. But i do not recall this action,
I feel duped, How do they think i will be able to financially manage in retirement.
And i have worked non stop from the age of 15, with only six months off when i was unemployed at the age of 58.
I am now paying into a company pension , not though that will give me anything at 65.
The Government has let us all down.
Renka
19th Oct 2015
3
Thanks for voting!
This is just a scam. The government will take your money and then give it back? So you give them an interest free loan.
A 70 year old woman would pay nearly £20k to get back £25/week ....BUT.... she would have to live until she was 85 to get all her money back. Who is going to guarantee that?
If she had £20k to spare she wouldn't need the £25 top up anyway.
It's the government cheating the people as usual.
redskins
15th Nov 2015
1
Thanks for voting!
I agree with that and you pay tax as well on it so that's more money to the government.Thats what's it is about.
Looking after you?ha

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