Set the record straight for Diabetes Week

Print Friendly

It’s Diabetes Week – an annual campaign to raise awareness about the condition. Never has diabetes been more prevalent; in the UK alone 3.5 million people are living with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and a further 549,000 people don’t yet know they have it.

Most of us know a friend or family member living with diabetes, yet for all it’s visibility, there are still many myths and misconceptions out there.

To help challenge preconceptions and raise awareness this year the campaign is centred around the theme Setting the record straight.

Clearing up the myths

While cancer and dementia may get more attention, more people have diabetes than the two diseases combined.

When diagnosed with diabetes it’s still possible to live a healthy, rounded and full life and enjoy all the same things as people without diabetes. Here’s some commonly held myths and the truth behind them:

  • Myth: Type 2 diabetes is a “mild form” of diabetes
    There’s no such thing as a touch of diabetes; both forms are serious and can lead to serious complications if left untreated.
  • Myth: Diabetic people need “diabetic” food
    This is false – strictly speaking, there’s no such thing as diabetic foods, and foods – particularly sweets – with ‘diabetic’ labelling can be misleading. All sweets, biscuits and high fat foods will affect your blood glucose levels, including specially formulated foods like diabetic chocolate. Diabetes UK doesn’t endorse eating ‘diabetic’ foods – if you’re going to treat yourself, it’s best to go for the real thing, and enjoy treats in moderation.
  • Myth: People with diabetes should avoid grapes, mangoes and bananas
    A commonly believed myth is that some fruits are off limits to people living with diabetes as they taste so sweet. Like all fruit, grapes and bananas make a healthy choice; they are high in fibre and low in fat and packed with vitamins and minerals. You can still achieve blood glucose control when including them in your diet.
  • Myth: People with diabetes should avoid sport
    Exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, and keeping active can help reduce the risk of complications as a result of diabetes. Before taking up a new exercise regime there may be some considerations worth speaking to your doctor about first, but in general, there’s no reason to avoid sport. Olympic gold-medal rower Steve Redgrave never let diabetes stop him! 

Finding out more about diabetes

If you’re interested in finding out more about diabetes, you can find plenty of resources on Silversurfers to help you on your way:

Do you know anyone with diabetes, or do you have it yourself? Share your experiences in the comments below!  




The following two tabs change content below.

Silversurfers Features Editor

Hello there! I’m Rachel and I’m the Features Editor for Silversurfers. I work behind the scenes to bring interesting, informative and entertaining subject matter to the Silversurfers community. I hope you enjoy the features we have shared with you. Please feel free to comment below and share your thoughts with us, we love to hear from you!

Latest posts by Silversurfers Features Editor (see all)

Not a member?

Join the silversurfers community today! It's free, easy to do, and is packed full of features and amazing offers!

Join the community!
Click here if you have forgotten your password
16th Jun 2016
Thanks for voting!
i apologise for all the typos
16th Jun 2016
Thanks for voting!
I have been a diabetic for over thirty years ,what annoys me is the Diabetes charities treat type 1 as victims and typ2e as criminals ! Many older people are type 2's and tgeir pancreas' just lose capacity .In my experience oust type 2's are sensible people . Many folks from the Indian sub continent and Afro Caribbean are diabetic although they do not eat vast quantities of junk food (a popular myth expanded by Diabetic charities and no nothing politicians )

Community Terms & Conditions

Content standards

These content standards apply to any and all material which you contribute to our site (contributions), and to any interactive services associated with it.

You must comply with the spirit of the following standards as well as the letter. The standards apply to each part of any contribution as well as to its whole.

Contributions must:

be accurate (where they state facts); be genuinely held (where they state opinions); and comply with applicable law in the UK and in any country from which they are posted.

Contributions must not:

contain any material which is defamatory of any person; or contain any material which is obscene, offensive, hateful or inflammatory; or promote sexually explicit material; or promote violence; promote discrimination based on race, sex, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age; or infringe any copyright, database right or trade mark of any other person; or be likely to deceive any person; or be made in breach of any legal duty owed to a third party, such as a contractual duty or a duty of confidence; or promote any illegal activity; or be threatening, abuse or invade another’s privacy, or cause annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety; or be likely to harass, upset, embarrass, alarm or annoy any other person; or be used to impersonate any person, or to misrepresent your identity or affiliation with any person; or give the impression that they emanate from us, if this is not the case; or advocate, promote or assist any unlawful act such as (by way of example only) copyright infringement or computer misuse.

Nurturing a safe environment

Our Silversurfers community is designed to foster friendships, based on trust, honesty, integrity and loyalty and is underpinned by these values.

We don't tolerate swearing, and reserve the right to remove any posts which we feel may offend others... let's keep it friendly!

More Diabetes & Stroke

May is Action on Stroke Month "Stroke" (cerebrovascular accident)
May is Action on Stroke Month, an initiative that aims to raise awareness on the symptoms and risk...
World Health Day 2016: Beat Diabetes Word diabetes
Thursday 7 April is World Health Day, and this year the campaign is focused on halting the rise of...
Lower your risk of Type 2 Diabetes Stethoscope and a syringe on a diabetes test
Diabetes is a condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to become too high. The...
Give a Hand week 26 October – 1 November 2015 silversurfers image - pine cone
Make, bake and create. Put your baking skills to the test this October.  Are you a wannabe...
In For A Sugar Shock? sugar
Sugar has been enemy number one in the media lately - but do you know just how much you're...
Stop Diabetes Developing diabetes1
A third of adults now have pre-diabetes, meaning millions are at risk of developing type 2 - but...
Mutation link to strokes discovered storke
A genetic mutation that can lead to haemorrhagic stroke has been identified by scientists - along...
Rationing risk to diabetes patients diabetes
People with diabetes are facing serious illness because the number of blood test strips available...
Concern over missing kidney tests KIDNEY TESTS
A quarter of people with diabetes have not been given a vital test to detect the early signs of...
Health features for June salmon
Below are a range of health tips from AXA PPP Healthcare, which you may find useful, with links...
Living with a heart condition fitness
This article focuses on Joanie Scott’s (52) experiences of having a stroke, how it was treated...
Safety review for diabetes drug Sugar guide
Medical experts are reviewing the safety of a widely used drug to treat diabetes after experts...