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How easy is it really to get a job when you’re over 50?

Have you tried to get a new job now your over 50? How easy was it?

The government has launched a new strategy calling on employers to boost the number of older workers and ensure they are not writing people off once they reach a certain age, helping to build a country that works for everyone.

It’s estimated that by mid-2030s people aged 50 and over will make up more than half of the UK adult population.

The government is encouraging people to take full advantage of the opportunities that work can bring, including seeking out a new career if they are feeling unfulfilled at work.

But what is the reality? Have you tried to get a new job aged 50+? Do you think ageism still rules the workplace? Have you started your own business because you got frustrated trying to find a job?

Tell us what you think:

Have you managed to get a new job aged 50 and over?

Yes
0%
No
0%
I have already retired
0%
Based on 135 public votes.

Do you think ageism persists in the workplace?

Yes
0%
No
0%
I have already retired
0%
Based on 120 public votes.

Have you started your own business because you couldn’t get a job?

Yes
0%
No
0%
This is something I am considering now
0%
Based on 125 public votes.

If you would be willing to be interviewed for Radio 4’s You and Yours programme before Thursday this week, please email [email protected]silversurfers.com

Please feel free to leave your comments below….

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arabella
10th Apr 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I'm 59 and have recently been made redundant. I had worked for the company for 6 years. I was fortunate to receive a redundancy as I'd worked for 6 years. I'm still coming to terms with the shock of the situation of which I had no inclination was about to occur. Six weeks I've been out of work.Jobsearching everyday for at least 40 hours per week. I've had 2 interviews from the many jobs I've applied for. I do realise that my application won't even be considered by many companies due to the 43 years I've worked.( In a nutshell I'm too old) I'm trying to remain positive about the situation, If the job situation does not improve soon. I may consider retraining. The local jobcentre may apply for funding to assist with retraining or becoming self employed. It's worth asking at Citizens Advice.
berylghotmailcom
15th Nov 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
I’m confused; I’m a female born in 50’s post war Britain, a child of the 60’s, a generation that was encouraged to invest in pension schemes to work and play hard, with the promise that our lives would be better than those of our parents, amongst those promises was a longer healthier life, a shorter working week and an earlier retirement age.
As a female the contraceptive pill brought my generation freedom from the fear of unplanned and unwanted pregnancy. Myself; I have been in full-time employment from the age of 16, (I’m now in my early 60’s) when I started work at 16 I was looking at a retirement age of 60 I am now looking at another 7 years, I learnt to drive as soon as I was able I own a car, I’ve travelled the globe, I’ve enjoyed fulfilling relationships and a happy marriage (although now widowed). I’ve brought and paid for my own home, I was a victim of the 70’s and the 90’s recessions made redundant in both, I am in work although earning around £12,000 less than I did in the 90’s, my husband and I chose not to have children and until their deaths my siblings and I looked after and cared for sick aging parents.
Am I unusual, well maybe not the norm for my generation but I’m not alone, I know several women whose stories could mirror mine own; one very close to me, who now 60 and finds herself redundant for the third time in five years, on her own with a mortgage in need of help and advice.
So what help is available in this time of need, almost nothing; all she is entitled to it the basic job seekers allowance a little over £70 per week, ah you might say she must has savings no she does not, for 13 weeks all she is entitled to is job seekers allowance at the end which she may be entitled to a little help towards the interest on her mortgage. So please explain how she is supposed to LIVE? wait until she’s unable to pay the bills lose her home which she has worked long and hard for, get thrown out on the street put up in B&B until perhaps the local authority or housing trust rehome her. Maybe then she would be able to claim all these benefits that at the moment as a lifelong contributor to this country she doesn’t appear to be entitled to (unless you can advise differently).
Perhaps a trip to the job centre (that’s a misnomer) they are an absolute joke this lady has been there asking for help/advice perhaps additional training all they are interested in is paperwork making sure you are searching and applying for jobs and completing a daily diary of your searches for them to check (pathetic).
This woman has over 40 years commercial experience and applies for work on a daily basis yet is offered few interviews and little to no feedback. Employment agencies don’t put her forward for positions because they say she has ‘too much experience’ even though she would be more than happy to do some of these jobs, she believes (I’m inclined to agree) this is a euphemism for your too old but how do you prove it.
So how do the people you see on the TV, hear on the radio and read about in the newspapers make a career out if being unemployed and have a much better life than myself and this woman?
Through the media we hear the government placing a great deal of emphasis on the 18-24 year old unemployed but what about the other end of the age spectrum who the government are expecting to work longer and longer, it seems we are the forgotten generation, we did everything that was expected of us and more, we dared to make a better life for ourselves have a better standard of living than our parents. My generation dared to move from factory floor manufacturing into the digital computerized age, did we try too hard, achieve too much, become too independent, that’s certainly what it feels like.
Would this woman be in a better position now if she had not taken contraception seriously and had a multiple of children via numerous partners and rarely if ever worked and relied on the state for everything for the last 40 years, again looking at reports in the media one might possibly say yes.
woodworm
9th Aug 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
I am young in outlook, full of energy, learn quickly, and have a full and active life. I am reasonably intelligent and get on well with people from all walks of life. I have held down very responsible jobs over the years, but now I am unable to gain further employment. Why? Think age has something to do with it. I am sick and tired of constantly sending out my CV (all this information about me just flying round, I hope they delete it after) just to get either no response or a 'thanks but no thanks'. I even got one reply saying that I did not live in the right area. There was no criteria in the ad that said I had to be able to walk to work! I can't give in as I need to be able to work full time in order for myself and husband to be able to manage. My husband has a degerative disease and when he's unable to work, I have to either support us or we have to turn to the State. Would prefer the former rather than the latter.
Darkstar
21st Jul 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
If you are upbeat and have a positive approach, getting a job should not be a problem. I started a new job aged 52.
JenyH
8th Jul 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
There is discriminating factor against ages and races. I am a Koran-American, I went to the Medical school at age 50, I can't find jobs... even though I was top of the class. I think, I am being a Korean-American and an old woman, I had a no chance. I got the CMA as soon as graduated from the school even though that wasn't good enough to find a job.
What is the funny part is, when they call me for a interview, they said " it's very impressive resume" but obviously, at the interview, they didn't expect to see an old oriental woman.
Yellowmellow
23rd Jun 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
I think it depends what field you work in. High flying companies seem to want, what they perceive to be, young, dynamic people. I am 63 years old, and working, so dont know what its like to be unemployed and being over 50. I have friends who have been made redundant over 50, and they seem to have found it very hard to find work. Even with new legislation, I think if a company doesn't want you they will find a way to ensure you don't get the job.
JohnHerb
9th Jun 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
I love gardening and have always thought about a landscape gardening company-just small. Us Silversurfers have got a wealth of experience so the last thing we should be doing is giving up work. Its a different world now compared to when I was a boy and its possible to set up on your own-you dont have to work for others. i think big companies will discriminate against older people especially like me over 60 but thats life.
Maryodell
27th Aug 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
Agree with your attitude, older people do have a wealth of experience, I love gardening though it is not my career I appreciate there is work out there for independent people willing to take it on. Also people who care about their gardens do want someone who knows what they are talking about so they can give advice. Go freelance, set your prices according to the time and work involved, might pay to get some business cards printed and in no time word of mouth can build your reputation. Not everyone wants just the lawns and hedges cut though that can be a good start.
GUSBARB2116
7th Jun 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
I WAS 50 YEARS OLD ON RETIRING FROM THE FORCES. I PRODUCED A GOOD CV IN WHICH I GAVE MY AGE AS 49. EMPLOyERS WOULD PREFER NOT TO EMPLOY A PERSON IN THE 50's, it is a phycho thing.
Lionel
6th Jun 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
Theoretically, it should be no more difficult to get a job in our age group than any other. Indeed, with our generation's record of diligence and using initiative in some places we are deemed to be very desirable employees.

That's the theory. There are two things militating against this.

First, those insurance companies who underwrite Employer's Liability Policies make a massive hike in premiums if a client employs someone over sixty. They're not happy with anyone freshly employed who is over fifty, some imposing strict conditions in their coverage of that person. Therefore, Whilst many employers don't want the job of sifting through so many youngsters to find that pearl of great price, they also don't want the on-cost implications of employing our age group.

Secondly, I'm sure many of us could do a part time delivery driver's job, for instance. Not so stressing and, outside city centres, could be quite pleasant. A change from a busy life. The Mem Sahib in my household likes to order what we need online and have it delivered. I draw the line at food - oh no, I want to see what I'm paying for!

But so many delivery driver's posts are taken by people from other countries. But that's work we could do to bring in a little more money, if it were needed. But the chances of getting such a job are diminished by imported labour.

Now, I'm not having a rant about migration, oh no, but I am saying opportunities which would otherwise be available to our age group are blocked for these reasons.

Please allow me to say I can't take a job now. My life is spent aiding my chronically sick wife who, only today, found out she has macular degeneration in both eyes and early onset of sightlessness beckons. So, my comments above are observations.
Chrisssy
5th Jun 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
I started my own business 12 years ago after leaving a career in Adult Education and Training - the recession has really affected sales and looking to have at least some guaranteed income, last Autumn I applied and got a part time job (8 hours per week but that suits me perfectly as I can still run my business) I'm 61 and my skills set perfectly matches the job I got. My understanding is that employers can't ask your age on job applications and one way to get an interview is to not include all your work experience or include dates of the achievement of any qualifications . Good luck to all those still searching
CherylD9
5th Jun 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
Confident and useful
SueW62
5th Jun 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
I have worked as a careers adviser helping many people 50+ try to find work usually following redundancy and it was very difficult but I did have a good success rate. Unfortunately the government funding was cut and my role ceased to exist so I was pressurised to leave. My job my being given totally unachievable targets.
I subsequently left my job at the age of 59. Since then I have not claimed any benefits but lived on my savings until depleted and now work on a zero hours contract on a much lower rate of pay than I have earned in many years. I now have to continue struggling until I am eligible for my pension when I am 66 unless the government raise the age, yet again!
2
Thanks for voting!
Hello Sue .. you sound like you've had a lot of experience in this area and your views and opinions would be really welcome ...would you be willing to be interviewed for Radio 4’s You and Yours programme before Thursday this week? Many thanks ... Sally 🙂
SueW62
5th Jun 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
Hi Sally, yes would be happy to contribute.
Regards Sue
2
Thanks for voting!
Hi Sue ... not sure if you saw my private chat message? That's really good news that you would be happy to contribute. Is it OK if I give your email address that you registered with to Denise Pritchard who is one of our Directors, so that she can make direct contact with you? I am not sure the full details and timings myself but I know Denise is the one who is liaising with BBC Radio 4 ... many thanks Sally 🙂
Billythequiche
5th Jun 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
Who the hell wants to work after 65? Retirement is great, plenty to do and the time to do it. Able to use mid-week deals and no time constraints. Not rich, never was but made sure house was paid for and a decent pension paid into.
Sorry if that sounds flippant to those not so well set, but we intend to enjoy our retirement after 50 years of making somebody else rich.
Wilf
5th Jun 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
I think as (hopefully) we are living longer people do work longer especially with part time jobs. I know quite a few mates and one of my brothers who is in his 60s who is working as a washer-up in a restaurant for a few hours a day. They like him as he is punctual and hard working. he gets to meet others and has a few extra quid in his pocket-whats not to like? I agree that after 50 odd years of working most of us want to take it a bit easier and not have a job that we have to worry about but its good to keep socialising and never to late to learn
Billythequiche
6th Jun 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
Can't argue with that, it's all down to whatever floats your boat, especially if your job was your life and not just a way of paying the bills.
Wilf
6th Jun 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
I agree with you about having more time...the thing I like about being this age is the flexibility of time as you say to go ito shops midday/midweek...not the tyranny of 8-5.30 as I had for 40 odd years. Its nice not to have to clock watch and do your own thing.
SueM59
5th Jun 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
The job I got is voluntary only, working in an office, and that too me 7 years of applying for jobs and hearing nothing back, at almost 61 I should not be spending hours applying for jobs I know I am not going to get.
Toptotty 65
5th Jun 2017
4
Thanks for voting!
Makes me feel useless I'm still active and need to keep myself busy not everyone over 50 is housebound

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