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Would you consider France as a family holiday destination?

Brexit effect sees Croatia and Mexico enter Top 10

As a child, you were much more likely to holiday in France with your family (if they were able to venture abroad) than you would be as a child today.

France has experienced a significant decline as a destination for British family holidays overseas, while Spain forges ahead as the top destination. Greece, Portugal and the United States are also gaining ground at the expense of France, according to new research by TakeTheFamily.com

Spain has the largest share of the market, with 38% of families taking holidays there last year, up from 28% in 2007 and 33% in 1997. France is firmly in second place with 18%, but family visitor numbers have halved
since the millennium.

This decline is driven primarily by the growth in air capacity across UK airports, making it relatively cheaper and easier for families to travel further afield. Yet few other countries offer families the same diversity,
from canoeing in the Ardèche to snow-biking in the Alps, from great beaches and countryside to fantastic cities. And France remains the top inbound destination for international visitors globally.

The study shows that Turkey suffered in 2016 and 2017 to the benefit of Greece and Western Europe, especially Portugal, but is experiencing revived fortunes in bookings for this summer. Mexico and Croatia made the Top 10 in 2017 for summer holidays. The US is the only long-haul destination consistently in the Top 10 over the past 20 years, but long-haul accounts for only 10% of family holiday travel.

Britain is still the overall family holiday or break favourite: of the 34 million family holidays taken last year, 19 million were taken in the UK, compared with 15 million abroad. The continued weakness of the pound against the euro will make Britain a popular choice for the foreseeable future.

Beach and seaside resort holidays continue to be the most popular family draw, with 44% of families saying they had enjoyed this type of break in the past three years. City breaks took second spot, with 26%, countryside holidays with 19% and holiday parks on 18%.

Full details of Take the Family’s family holiday market research

What are your views?  Would you take your family to France for a holiday, or are there other destinations that you prefer?

Would you consider France as a family holiday destination?

192 people have already voted, what's your opinion? Yes No

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Costezuela
20th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
As a family we took holidays in various parts of France and found that the people in the south were likely to be friendlier than those in the north - however, these days I am rather biased as I have lived in Spain for 20 years. I live in a small mountain village 18 Kms from the Mediterranean and have to say that the only downside to living here are the ignorant and , sometimes, arrogant Brit tourists who treat the lovely Spanish locals like ******!!
JanetA66
20th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Love France, and contrary to what a lot of people think, the French people are lovely and very welcoming to British people and their way of life is very family orientated. Brittany is beautiful and so easy to get to, either by plane or ferry. The French countryside is gorgeous.
JanE9
20th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
France is a lovely destination to take children. We have four and when they were younger we had great holidays there. The campsites are great - we hired static caravans. The children would go off to the football pitch and make friends with other children from lots of European countries. The countryside is beautiful and there are great places to visit. Carcasonne is lovely and the area around it, as is Collioure and the region around it too. The gorge du verdon is amazing! And Doucier is a very beautiful place and not as visited as other parts of France. The weather in the summer is fantastic all over France but especially in the ?South. If you are down in the south of France and have a car you can go into Spain or Italy depending on which side of the country you are staying on. And where else do you see wild flamingos!
Whittler
20th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Breakfast in Exeter at 07am, flight to Nice and into a holiday home in Port Grimaud, Cote D'azur by 2:30pm. Fantastic beaches, great weather and amazing food - what's not to like?
NickiP
19th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
It's so easy to get to France and such an interesting, beautiful & varied country. The area round Carcasonne is a favourite of mine, but there are many other regions I would love to explore! We took the children to France several times - much more to see & explore than just lying around on a beach! This year we're going to The Luberon (Provence), an area which is new to us apart from seeing it as a location for the film 'A Good Year' starring Russell Crowe. I can't wait!
Helen Highwater
19th Mar 2018
-1
Thanks for voting!
My European holiday destination of choice is always Italy - I love the lakes. For city breaks, I enjoy Germany and Belgium. France has never done it for me.
staffie girl
19th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
We go to France for two weeks with Eurocamp have done for years now ,we go to a different region seen quite a few ,plenty of good friendly campsite to suit everyone we are of to the Vendee this year .
leee
19th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Already booked for September. We go at least once a year and this year we're going to Cabourg in Normandy.
JulieY
19th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I've been looking for package holidays to France for quite a while now - sure there are holidays to the South of France but never seem to be able to find package deals for say, Brittany or Normandy etc - or I'm looking in the wrong places.
StanL
19th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Much easier to get to France these days would prefer the South of France the Perpignan area as a base .
Kathan
12th Mar 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Went 4 years running whilst daughter was learning French - unfortunately she didn't want to speak while out there so I had to use my schoolgirl French! However, we would both love to go back to visit France.
LadyDre
11th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
It's an easy place to go for me as I speak French raesonably well and they are not astounded by single women.......
They also have a very positive attitiude to cyclist and motor cyclists
Dandylion2
10th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
It holds no interest for me. There are far more interesting and exciting places to visit
Codger456
10th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Lots of variety, quaint villages, good food
macilroy
10th Mar 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
Fantastic camp sites been going since 1965,the facilities are some of the Best we have used on the continent, hoping to get to a ready erected site before the heat of the summer, hubby is 81 and I'm 75, we just prefer ⛺️
anno
9th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Years and years of happy holidays camping in all areas of France, with the family and after they all went off to do their own things. Highly recommended.
bluemoon239
9th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Personally I prefer Italy , great climate good food and wine and friendly locals.
But, then I’ve lived there over 20 years.
Airman
9th Mar 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
France has been our main holiday destination for 50 plus years and we made permanent friends of French people.
France is good for caravanning
IreneNightingale
9th Mar 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Lived in the dordogne for 14 years until last October. Loved it, back due to age and needed to downsize.
LesleyC7
9th Mar 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Have been to France many times, staying in hotels and Eurocamp, would recommend it to anyone.
padvile
9th Mar 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
We go to France at least twice each year (for the past 20 years!)
Annylaurie
16th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
What area do you go to please?
padvile
16th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
We go to the Rouen area or to the South around Cannes/Nice
mralan
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Good food and wine
magselly
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
France is brilliant for family holidays, great camping sites with amazing pools and facilities
Jenkiro
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
France is a fascinating country, with wonderful and varied geography, a rich history and striking culture. There is a positive attitude towards families, and pets, which opens avenues to enjoy that are often closed in other locations. There are amazing places to visit and the opportunity to see different wildlife, someth8ng for everyone.
MargaretB24
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
been on holiday to France for last 10 years, love the Puy Du Fou in Vendee region
hatters
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Lovely country we went there every other year for 20 years plus ,lots to see great countryside good food
granfran
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I would find the location very handy. For health reasons I cannot do long haul travel. Going to France would give an option on travel, car,sea or fly. Wow, perfect!
Rte de Cabans
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
So much to see and do. The landscape in France is so varied and the pace of life conducive to relaxing breaks. Eating out is a joy too - it’s very easy to find good quality food at a reasonable price and house wines tend to be good local wines that are perfectly gluggable.
ChristineE4
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Love France and have enjoyed many long (8 weeks) happy holidays in our caravan. Leaving the EU would not change that for me I would still visit France.
JaneyM
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
We took the children to France for years. One half term week, as we couldn't afford more. We ALWAYS had a great time, staying at campsites in various parts of the country. Happy memories.
Comment Removed
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Lionel
9th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Tender, I feel we should move this discussion to private chat. Just click Private chat with Lionel at the end of one of my posts.
Lionel
9th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Further to that, on the right hand side of your scree is a blue button with a white triangle in it. Click that and you may start chat, check if anyone has sent a message and clicking on that message send a reply.
Tender
9th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I agree with you on private chat and have requested that Sally remove the last 2 of my post above.
glockwood1950
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
An easily accessible beautiful country ideal for a road trip on their ultra smooth pothole free roads, its big so ideally drive for 3-4hrs excluding stops in small towns then overnight in IBIS hotels.
Woottonm
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Why not - its a long time since I visited France (to many years to mention) but the scenery was wonderful.

My husband took a group of scouts to the South of France years ago and they throughly enjoyed it so I am sure it would be nice for families.

Why not give it a try
AndyC6
6th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I'm Take the Family's founder. I was initially very surprised by our research findings, having thoroughly enjoyed so many holidays there with my kids. While it's now often easier and less expensive for families to travel beyond France, a French holiday typically offers so much more than warmth and sun, relative to many currently popular family holiday destinations. Your thoughts?
Wilf
6th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Yes I think France has a huge variety, mountains, lovely towns, great food and wonderful beaches.
Pam1960
6th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I am happy to holiday anywhere especially if I haven't been before except for countries at war. Travel and being able to experience a country's culture and gastronony is a wonderful thing. I do like France and will continue to visit after Brexit
Julie2
6th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I went to France on holiday last year and found it was all really expensive. It was supposed to be a cheaper holiday yet paying 5 euros for a punnet of strawberries from a market is too costly! I have recently returned from a Spanish island and costs were so much cheaper for meals and items in the supermarket etc. I personally prefer the all inclusive holidays knowing everything is already paid for and no huge costs when away
Wilf
6th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I agree. France used to be quite cheap back in the days of the Franc. I remember going to get wine at Calais in my car and got loads of boxs for vertually nothing. Cheaper in our supermarkets now! I do like France though. Just 20 miles away and feels so foreign. Lovely food and very interesting towns
Wilf
6th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I love France with its wonderful food and countryside especially in areas like the Ardeche in the south. I spent 1976 picking grapes in the South of France which was a good time but hard work.
Tender
6th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I am pretty much home-bound and that is okay with me. Since my husband died in Sept of 2017, I travel places by internet. :0)
Lionel
6th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
My wife has MS so we can't travel anymore.
Tender
6th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Perhaps your wife could come join this forum? That would be a blessing for all. Wedded believers posting here--what a great idea!
Lionel
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
She is on Silver Surfers actually, but while she reads so many posts she seldom contributes. I don't know why?
Tender
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Hello to her and I understand. Lots of folks like to just surf and read. That is okay--to each his or her own desires.
Lionel
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I couldn't add to that, Tender. In our early married years - we're both second marrieds 20 years ago, we travelled Europe and Central Europe to the Russian border extensively. We did that in a home built VW camper. We needed to make memories. And make them we most surely did.

Now my wife is more or less incapacitated those memories persist and we reflect on them with some amount of amusement.

These days we're more content at home or in our garden. We live in a most beautiful and fairly remote part of North Suffolk in the East of England. The freedoms we enjoy are denied city dwellers. Evidence of the handiwork of our great Creator God is all about, throughout all seasons.

Holidays have become an irrelevance when we live in a secret holiday spot visited by very few. Who would want to leave? Not us.
Tender
7th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I love to read about your experiences and others as well.
Makes for a good education in real time.

You might find it interesting that I was once a Notre Dame nun.
(Sister Mary Bernadine) I left the convent and got married and had 4 children (2 girls and 2 boys). Now I have 7 grandkids.

I also have a twin sister in Colorado. Many folks have told me to write a book about my life but I just never had the desire.
Lionel
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Tender, I'm not at all surprised you sought the religious life. There's just that something that comes through as you write.

I'll pick up this thread a little later as I'm cooking dinner. It's almost 19.00 here. Be back later.
Tender
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Cooking dinner? What you fixin? Now that I am alone, the microwave gets used much more often. lol
Check back later.......take your time and enjoy the food.
Lionel
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Well, I'm a good English cuisine cook, according to a now dead friend who was an early master chef of this country.

Tonight, roast chicken and all the English trimmings. My wife is rallying a little from MS thanks to a shift in the vitamin regime she takes and that rally must be supported with wholesome, nutritious food. My dogs ate well this evening and tomorrow we will have Buber's Chicken Soup. I am a follower of Yeshua these very many years but I remain a Jew and as often as I can eat Kosher. But allow me to say here, Paul liberated us all to eat everything, it's just that Kosher is so good.

Over these many years I have yearned for the monastic life. Raised a Jew for my first decade I was slotted into an Anglo-Catholic church as a choir boy at nine years old. That was more to do with my father than my Jewish mother and grand parents. It was at that Billy Graham rally the matter of who am I was resolved. Yet I guess i've ridden two horses for much of my life.

The order you went into, was it closed or open?

In the late eighties, when the Troubles between Eire and Britain were at their fiercest I spent two years in Eire. Time was occupied by milking cows and speaking in convents and monasteries. A great time of eye opening and embracing a brotherhood in Christ. A couple of priests became life long friends.

Write a book about your life, well, yes, my journey of faith, and my journey through life, has not been quite the usual. My wife and others have put pressure on me to write about it but like you, I just don't have that urge. There's far too many 'Christian' books out there and who wants to know about a young Jewish lad who found Jesus at a Billy Graham rally? Not many I think.

Both my wife and her daughter, with whom I'm very close, have asked often about my exploits - they go far beyond farms in England. I'm pleased to tell them because it's our testimony that builds faith in them. They've urged me to write but that doesn't sit well with me. I would rather her say in the dim and distant future, yes, my step father was used as an instrument in this, or that.

England's last great evangelist, Smith Wigglesworth could neither read nor write when he married his wife 'Polly' in the latter part of the 19th century. She taught him to read. Yet, throughout his ministry which spanned the US, Australia, New Zealand and Europe, he never recorded a word, because he couldn't. Todays writings about him are the result of a stenographer following him around. I think that record is the more powerful because it's not directly from him.

Come back Tender, you've a lot to teach me.
Tender
7th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
WOW----it is fabulous that you chose to share all of the above facts with me and the other readers here. When you spoke at the convents and monasteries, what was your favorite subject to present?
If I were the speaker, mine would have been the subject of God's grace! I really learned more about that when I left the convent and did many various Bible studies.
I was brought up in an extremely fanatical atmosphere and was constantly programmed with the concept of hell-fire from the age of 5. I was told that only nuns and priests had found the right way to heaven. LOL So--as I matured and found out that "others" can enter heaven due to the salvation offered on Calvary's cross, I went on my happy way walking in the wonderful grace of God. We faithful ones know that grace is NOT a license to sin.
I was in an open teaching order and found that teaching children delighted me immensely but I could not remain truly happy without having my very own.
Lionel
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I'm happy to share with you Tender. As said, our testimony ... Even as long time Christians our testimony encourages each other. I take great comfort from the Early Church Father's writings. It's their testimony to us.

What was my favourite subject? Well, I can't tell you because I don't know! I'm very shy, very reserved, very private and detest crowds. To stand up in front of a congregation is sheer torture to me. I would get up, and look about me. The amazing thing is I could only ever see the two or three front rows! There is a verse in the Psalms, you may know it. Open thy mouth wide and I will fill it. At that point I would always say that verse and add, good Lord, this might be a very good time to make good on that promise. And He did! Every time.

With an open Bible, which I was coming to know quite well, I'd begin in faith. What I said I don't now know. The same applied when back in the UK. I spoke in many churches and fellowships in the North of England and dreaded to the point of heavily sweating in the service before being called, that time speaking. But God never failed me. There is no fear in the Lord, the Bible says and when we are forced by circumstance to confront our fears He breaks through gloriously.

How Billy Graham, which is where we began, could speak to a million plus people in South America I cannot comprehend. Would I be crude in saying I would have wet myself? Been close to it before.

Grace is a less well understood concept. Paul said, shall we sin the more that grace may abound? No of course not. Law and grace is equally misunderstood, or sometimes deliberately misused. Being a Jew I know about living under Law. I was circumcised and Bar mitzvahed and found liberation in the Jewish Messiah. Yet so many Gentile Christians look to living under Law to please God. Why place that so heavy yoke upon one's shoulders to please God when he has given us Grace, that unmerited favour, in His Son? Why go back to Law when Jesus lived the perfect Mitzvah life and opened the gate of a law free Covenant for all men?

I don't understand it!

Tender, I'm beginning to love this conversation. Let's keep it going, please.

Right now its well past midnight. I've been awake 18 hours and I need to sleep. Please keep writing.
Tender
8th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
LOL--well let me be honest and say that I am not near as interesting a person as you are Lionel.
I just added to another one of your post over yonder.
You are a wealth of knowledge and I hope to READ more.
rather than post more. Goodness sake--I could get dubbed
the internet stalker by people who don't understand that old folks can still learn from somebody younger than they.
Keep smilin brother!
Tender
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Thought you might get a chuckle out of this true story (my own convent experience).
As you probably know all things are somber and serious, especially during something that they called "Grand Silence". You do not talk or make any noise after 9 p.m. Well, I was new to convent life at the time and was determined to do my very best. I went to what I thought was the linen closet only to discover that it was storage closet of cleaning supplies (brooms, buckets,mops etc.) As I opened it, one of the buckets fell off its hook and landed on my foot, sending it all the way down the stairwell that ran alongside of it. (BANG BANG!!)
Well the proper thing to do was to go the following morning in front of the entire community
of nuns and ask for a penance. So I said to the Mother Suoerior and other nuns, "I have come before you to ask for a penance for having broken grand silence last evening. I'm sorry but I kicked the bucket." All seriousness turned to laughter!!
I got a penance of having to kneel to eat my very next meal.
Lionel
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
It's not often anyone refers to me as younger, these days!
Lionel
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I loved that story! So, well, as it happened.

Here's one from my days as a choir boy in London.

I think I was 13 years old. All the choir, 30 boys and 15 men were summoned to the funeral of a local civic dignitary. We got a day off school, yippee!

It was scheduled to be a 3 hour service for about 1500 - 2000 people culminating in the Eucharist - as close to the Mass as the High Church of England dare go.

We processed along the nave passing the open coffin and headed for the choir stalls - just as rehearsed. At some point during a rather long and difficult to sing anthem there was a very loud groan from the coffin and we boys all saw the torso lift to almost vertical.

We boys fled to the doors either side of the altar into the vestry. We were all spooked.

After a few minutes the senior cleric came in and tried to calm us, but to no avail. We were not going out there agin until that coffin was removed.

Such a funeral, requiring us to devote all our non school time to practice and rehearsals for about two weeks meant we were paid a handsome sum. The senior cleric, failing to get us to move offered bribes.

In 1964 England £2 was lot of money. That morning the bidding reached £5 before we would go back into the church. After that all went without a hitch.

You probably know, the angelic appearance of choir boys belies their real selves. That was certainly the truth in my case.
Tender
8th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
I would still be spooked today had that happened in my presence. lol
Thanks for sharing Lionel.
Lionel
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Here's another of a different timbre.

The Christmas of my 12th year I was selected to sing a solo to a very packed church at the Watchnight Service on Christmas Eve. Now, let it be said, this was the first of I think a dozen choral services over the Christmas period. Feasts and festivals were always hard work; long hours and months of rehearsal beforehand. But we got so well paid.

That solo, the first verse of Once in Royal David's City, was sung from the back of the church where a vast array of organ pipes sat, just behind the balcony. I had the power and the vocal range to fill the church and did so without too much effort. But, afterwards needed to get down 50' of spiral stone steps to the nave to join the procession at the West end of the church.

My cassock snagged on something and tore, but it left me firmly anchored. As I struggled the organ pipes, no more than 6' behind me struck and and the blast of air and sound knocked me off me feet. Only then could the snag be untangled from my cassock.

Rejoining the procession in a candle lit church we proceeded up the nave lit with candles. At one point I saw my mum standing at the end of a pew. A nice Jewish lady she was in floods of tears. That was her son singing and it brought her to a deep place. Not so long after that she embraced Jesus, and a couple of years later so did I!

I can so clearly remember that night even to this day. My mum, who didn't belong in a church, so pleased with her son.
Lionel
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
And one more, if I'm not boring silly.

My social weakness is my sense of humour. Here's an example.

When my second wife and I got married the law required us to be married in a civil service, and then we could go wherever for a Christian blessing.

In England a civil wedding is a serious business, no laughter and all very straight faces. At our civil service my wife was required to say aloud her profession. 'Chiropodist,' she said.

At which point the registrar threw off her shoes and asked her if she would attend to her feet.

The sight of the registrar throwing up her bare feet, baring her underwear, on a table at such a solemn moment and requesting my wife's professional help, well, hysterics set in.

I think I said the right words that day, well, we were legally married but, the next day at the Salvation Army where our union was blessed I most definitely said the right thing.
Tender
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
>>> At one point I saw my mum standing at the end of a pew. A nice Jewish lady she was in floods of tears. That was her son singing and it brought her to a deep place. Not so long after that she embraced Jesus, and a couple of years later so did I!

How amazing--the grace and favour of God bestowed upon both of you!! AMEN and AMEN!!
Tender
8th Mar 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
ROFLOL---how does one not laugh at such a scene??
Lionel
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Yes, Tender, for a Jewish person to open themselves to Jesus is a very, very big step. The price is so very high. It did cost my mum and I so dearly in work day terms.

But nothing is regretted today.
Lionel
8th Mar 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
On the day of our wedding the Salvation Army officer was treading on egg shells dealing with a Jew, albeit a Christian Jew. ( detest that) The service, which we had written, went just fine. Afterward in the lobby the officer greeted me warmly and, after a moments contemplation, touched my tallith. He apologised straight away.

'Here, allow me.' I put the prayer shawl around his shoulders and my kippur on his head. He cried.

'I've preached Christ and Him crucified for forty five years and never met a Jew. Yet He was a Jew, the Jew. '

He reached for the one long hassle which Moses commanded us to have. ''Jesus had this on his Tallith, didn't he?' 'Yes.'

'Take my tallith and kippur, they're yours.'

'No, I'm not a Jew. These things aren't mine by right. But, I'll tell you, I'm a changed man today.'

A few weeks later, after some enquiries, I suspected William Booth, founder of the Salvation Army in 1865, was of Jewish origins. A call to the officer who married us gave a contact for the official Salvation Army historian who lived no more than 30 miles from us.

After a while he confirmed William Booth was born of Jewish parents and was indeed a Messianic Jew.

Tell me what you think of Pope John Paul?
Alicia
6th Mar 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
No because I do not go abroad anymore.

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