image

Is enough being done to support people with diabetes?

More people than ever have diabetes, and if something doesn’t change soon, more than five million people in the UK will have diabetes by 2025.

Around 90% of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes – which is at least in part preventable through diet and lifestyle.

Diabetes charities and advocates for the disease believe people need to be made more aware of their risk of Type 2 diabetes and given better support to manage it.

For all that diabetes is a common buzzword and many people are warned that number of people living with diabetes is rising, many still struggle to get the support they need.

What do you think? Is enough done being to help people with diabetes? What should be done? 

Is enough being done to support people with diabetes?

93 people have already voted, what's your opinion? Yes No

What are your views?

We'd love to hear your comments

Not a member?

You need to be a member to interact with Silversurfers. Joining is free and simple to do. Click the button below to join today!

Click here if you have forgotten your password
viking
10 hours ago
0
Thanks for voting!
Maybe this article has been read by people with influence ! There have been several programmes now on television giving some really useful details on correct diet.
GillR38
6 days ago
1
Thanks for voting!
I have been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and was called to the surgery to be given the news with also high blood pressure. I was given my medication,told to make an appointment to see the nurse to have feet checked and an appointment to see the diabetic nurse. When I saw the diabetic nurse I was given a book about Type 2 Diabetes and told that she would be monitoring me. I was given a number to ring about doing an all day course at my hospital. It’s at this course that it all becomes clearer. Am waiting for this appointment at the moment. Have appointment for eye check soon . I found it all abit overwhelming to start with but I’ve made a start. More exercise. Lost a stone in weight. Been 6 weeks.
ChristineC8
12th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
It would be helpful if the dieticians were much clearer about what constitutes carbohydrates as to most it consists of potatoes, bread and pasta.

I knew I should eat carbohydrates but didn't realise that so many vegetables were within this group of foods and since adjusting my diet have far greater control of my sugar levels.
MrsPat
12th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I think the NHS are helping but its for the government to wean us all off suger, chocs, alcohol etc and then we will have a lot less of this dreadful condition. Mrs May get moving please.
Cropcrop
6 days ago
1
Thanks for voting!
Surely it’s up to us to do this for ourselves and take responsibility for our own actions?, the government is not responsible for the way we choose to eat! We have to make sensible choices for ourselves.
Cropcrop
12th Jun 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
People need to take stock of what they put into their bodies and try to help themselves. There is far too much fast food, ready meals and highly processed food being eaten, many of which generally have high levels of fat and sugar and goodness knows how many additives in them all of which we don’t need and which may actually be damaging to us. If we go back to real cooking, good ingredients and have a basic knowledge of nutrition we can help ourselves. Too many people want the quick option of popping pills but don’t understand that everything we put in our mouths has an effect on our body, our liver and kidneys have to process it all with possible long term problems. Type 1 is a whole different animal and needs medication but type 11 can potentially be managed and possibly avoided by eating well, keeping a healthy body weight and taking more exercise if we are able. Attitudes and responsibility need looking at, we can try to help ourselves if we really want to. It’s too easy these days to blame everybody else and expect them to sort it out for us, we need to take responsibility for our own actions and let the NHS care for people who are really ill.
jeanmark
6 days ago
0
Thanks for voting!
Well said Cropcrop.
Alicia
12th Jun 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
It can be controlled by diet but most people prefer to eat junk food and be ill 🙁
barney1
12th Jun 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I was recently told by my Gp that I am Pre Diabetic. When I asked what I could do to help stop any further progress he said don't eat so much fruit and that was all the help I was offered. I am now looking for information to help myself as I have enough other health problems, without adding more.
krzys52
11th Jun 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Iwas diagnosed type 2 15 years ago and did nothing to help myself. I just took the pills and continued without changing my habits. Result ....medication was increased and the side affects were detrimental in a particular area. So after listening to the advice and making a few painless changes I am now on 50% less medication and less than what I was given when first diagnosed. Its not that difficult but you have to want to do it. I am also 2 stones lighter. I can still have naughty snacks (I have a very sweet tooth) but taken in moderation it has not been a problem. Now working towards further medication reduction.
Tonydad
11th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Hi, I am facilitator for West Bank who deliver the NHS Healthier You : National Diabetes Prevention Programme (NDPP) In the south west. This is a national programme to support people with pre diabetes to make changes and you can be referred by your GP to your nearest course.You will need to have an HbA1c between 42-47 or FPG 5.5 - 6.9 More information on www.england.nhs.co.uk.
Spider1972
11th Jun 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
My husband was diagnosed last year with type 2 diabetes. I went on the Internet and found Dr Michael Mosley blood sugar diet books. We followed the plan for 8 weeks then went onto maintenance. When my husband went back to the doctors after three months and had more tests his diabetes had been reversed. It is possible by changing your lifestyle and diet. A year later he is still in remission and his weight is the same. Help us there but you have to look for it.
Icecream
11th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I’ve been led to believe that type2 diabetes is non reverseable, once you’ve got it you can keep it in check as I’ve been doing for the past two years but you cannot reverse it.
JackieC74
11th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Every person with T1 or 2 should be entitled to have a meter, test strips & lancecets to enable them to control there sugars/glucose......its disgusting that we have a Prime Minister with the disease who can afford the best on the market products advertises the fact by showing off her diabetes disc on her arm & yet people on the other end of the scale who cannot afford to buy the dearer products with less carbs & sugar are denied the equipment accessories that would allow them to keep a tight control on the disease!!!!!!
tammypettifer
9th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
It's all good and well being told you have Diabetes. At first you receive a lot of information and see a lot of different people like a dedicated diabetes nurse, dietetic consultant. But afterwards you are left to struggle by yourself and there is not a lot of help out there except for Diabetes UK. I definitely agree that more needs to be done to support people with type 2 Diabetes.
jeanmark
9th Jun 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
The problem tammypettifer is, who should give the support? The NHS is in crisis and it is estimated already spend 1 million pounds a day on type 2 diabetes.
jorid
10th Jun 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Sorry tammypettifer---look and yea shall find. Fortunately i am not afflicted this way but still know a lot about it from different scources. NHS internet have good advice.
ChristineH1
9th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I have had Type1 diabetes for 38 years.. It has been a struggle at times and it is a constant balancing act to stay healthy and keep my weight under control but I have to live this way. I live in Cumbria and have always had wonderful support from the diabetic team both at my GP surgery and hospital.

Type1 and Type2 diabetes are totally different conditions

People are too fat. That is the main problem and this is only just starting to be said.
lyndaob
8th Jun 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
My husband is type 2 and manages with diet and medication. We find it hard to believe that with so many diabetics in the country that leading supermarkets do not do a 'sugar free' range. You can find wheat free, gluten free and dairy free but no sugar free. Yes there are 'no added sugar' items but these can still be high in sugar.
Kazudeoji
8th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
My Sister has struggled with diabetes for many years with little support. This can be life threatening for some people and people should not struggle alone.
viking
8th Jun 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Being my usual cynical self, the effects of a diet and lifestyle change have been known for sometime now, but have been largely ignored by press and TV until recently. Statistics now released show that if the rate continues to spiral then the NHS could go under with the weight of demand.
If this information about diet and lifestyle was known previously why was it not acted upon until now ?? Horse and stable door again ??
jeanmark
9th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
You are right Viking, the effects of diet and life style have been well known for some time but I think that is part of the problem. The information has been out there but it has been ignored until the media started to highlight we had a problem!
jeanmark
8th Jun 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
Like Jorid, I find this a little difficult to answer, despite having worked for the NHS for too many years. I also accept that people should be aware that type 1 and type 2 diabetes cannot be compared.

There is a great deal of information out there from reliable sources and thus I find it difficult when people believe not enough is being done for them. Is this an example of the NHS being a victim of its own success? Yes, I accept some services may have been reduced, but this situation may also be unavoidable when you consider how much money is already spent on this one disease.

My mother had type 2 diabetes for many years, dying when she was 89. She was well aware of what she should do and could do, but chose to do what she wanted to. When she developed a diabetic ulcer and foot that caused incredible pain during the last years of her life, she accepted that things 'may' have been different if she had followed professional advise. She was also realistic in understanding that even if she had done everything she was told, you can not guarantee avoidance of complications. Her close friend stuck to a rigid diet and life style but still developed diabetic induced blindness and died from diabetic induced renal failure.

The NHS already spends an estimated million pounds a day on type 2 diabetes, a disease that is now developing in children, something unheard of in the past. What ever information there is out there, it can only be of use if people also take a degree of responsibly for their own health, rather than expect the state to do it for them. I have met many people who, having developed the disease, believe the NHS should take care of them rather than expecting them to change their lifestyle to help halt it's progression. At the other end of the scale, I have met many people who have worked hard to make changes and still develop complications. So, is there an answer out there?
rubythursday
8th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
my son is type 2 diabetic and he has never been given any information about how to manage his condition. He only visits a clinic once a year and has been waiting over 6months for an appointment to see a chiropodist.
I would therefore assert that there is definitely a lack of support,
jeanmark
9th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Then maybe rubythursday, it is a post code lottery? In my experience people who are first diagnosed usually get a great deal of support relating to changes in diet and life style. It is just as time goes by they may feel abandoned, but there is readily available information online such as that from DiabetesUK and other UK websites. Most GP Health Practices have information leaflets and there are a number of recipe books etc for diabetics to use. I accept Chiropody services may appear to have reduced, but that is probably a matter of an increase in demand for the service, availability of professional podiatrists plus cost.
jorid
8th Jun 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I did not answer poll as i do not know if enough is being done. So much pressure on NHS more research and things found out more to be done. NHS has its limits too.
A Programme on tv recant was showing how type 2 can be helped. A lot of folks i know expect to be spoon fed though and sometimes i risk scorn as i tell them to learn and help themselves.
JeremyHayden
8th Jun 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
I arrived in the UK 14 years ago as a type 2 diabetic on diet and exercise control only. Over time the diabetes has become worse, leading to the use of pills. Of late the only solution offered has been "go on insulin".
Through research and a bit of info from a nutritionist I have had to work out a diet which now gives me better control, using the pills. Interestingly the diet changes areas not covered by any of the diabetic information or pamphlets I have seen, such as cutting out dairy and various meats.
grandmajess
8th Jun 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
I have just been diagnosed as on the verge of diabetes, so I am changing my diet myself.
I thought I ate healthily, but on checking, I find my cereal and fruit breakfast is high in sugar, so I have changed it, and I am cutting down on bread and potatoes, don’t know if it will work, but I have to sort this out, don’t want to take medication for it
jorid
8th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Good for you keep it up wishing you back to health
alisonmay
8th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Charges are now made for chiropody etc which used to be free.

Community Terms & Conditions

Content standards

These content standards apply to any and all material which you contribute to our site (contributions), and to any interactive services associated with it.

You must comply with the spirit of the following standards as well as the letter. The standards apply to each part of any contribution as well as to its whole.

Contributions must:

be accurate (where they state facts); be genuinely held (where they state opinions); and comply with applicable law in the UK and in any country from which they are posted.

Contributions must not:

contain any material which is defamatory of any person; or contain any material which is obscene, offensive, hateful or inflammatory; or promote sexually explicit material; or promote violence; promote discrimination based on race, sex, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age; or infringe any copyright, database right or trade mark of any other person; or be likely to deceive any person; or be made in breach of any legal duty owed to a third party, such as a contractual duty or a duty of confidence; or promote any illegal activity; or be threatening, abuse or invade another’s privacy, or cause annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety; or be likely to harass, upset, embarrass, alarm or annoy any other person; or be used to impersonate any person, or to misrepresent your identity or affiliation with any person; or give the impression that they emanate from us, if this is not the case; or advocate, promote or assist any unlawful act such as (by way of example only) copyright infringement or computer misuse.

Nurturing a safe environment

Our Silversurfers community is designed to foster friendships, based on trust, honesty, integrity and loyalty and is underpinned by these values.

We don't tolerate swearing, and reserve the right to remove any posts which we feel may offend others... let's keep it friendly!