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Do Millennials deserve £10K for doing nothing?

A report published yesterday by the Resolution Foundation think tank and endorsed by the head of the CBI says that all 25-year-olds should be given £10,000 ‘Citizens Inheritance’ to help them onto the housing ladder to help rebalance the difference in wealth between the generations.

The payment is intended to redistribute wealth at a time when young people need it most to find housing, return to education or start a business.

It is also intended to reduce resentment towards baby boomers (born 1946-65) who have typically done better out of the housing market and pensions than any subsequent generation.

This would be paid for by taxing rich pensioners and reducing the inheritance tax threshold.

The findings will be seized on by millennials (born 1981-2000) who believe they have been miscast as spendthrift hedonists who would rather splash out on artisan coffee and slices of avocado on toast than save for a house deposit.

How do you feel about this recommendation? Do Millennials deserve £10K for doing nothing? Will this amount be sufficient to help Millennials get onto the housing ladder?

Do Millennials deserve £10K for doing nothing?

1137 people have already voted, what's your opinion? Yes No

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Malcmister
8th Jun 2018
0
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I’ve worked all my life and I live in a council flat with my wife because we can’t afford to buy a house, now I’m 65 and retired, how about the government giving me and thousands of others say a £100,000 gift for boing nothing
viking
25th May 2018
1
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At this moment in time it is easy for the snowflakes to express themselves in whatever media they choose. They genuinely feel that they are hard done by. Having seen programmes on the TV where they bleet about how easy it was in their parents days to obtain finance and buy houses !!
Most of the readers will no doubt recall that in years gone by there was no possibility of airing our views on social media or television, we just had to" get on with it" and knuckle down. Hence the previous bleet about our five jobs !!
Onecott
25th May 2018
0
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I don’t necessarily think they deserve it,but I think perhaps some sort of finiacal pacakge to assit them getting on the property ladder in the first place.
We often hear that affordable homes are being built,but one has to wonder who they are affordable to,
RosemaryF5
20th May 2018
4
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We worked hard to get our first home. No going out, no drinking, not much socialising. We chose to have fun by not spending too much. But we were committed to saving the 10% required before my then fiance could get a mortgage that did not include my salary. I have always been careful not to be too free and easy with giving money. Things are much more appreciated if they are obtained through hard graft not handed to you on a plate. Young people need to be educated on work ethics and rewards.
Lionel
20th May 2018
1
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Well said. I agree.
Champagne Chick
20th May 2018
1
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Hubby and I saved for five years for a deposit on a house. In that time we did without everything that wasn't a necessity. We haven't had it easy as the younger generation think.
Lionel
20th May 2018
0
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We didn't have it easy as second marrieds 20 years ago either so I understand. Well said.
barbaratoms
19th May 2018
2
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They expect too much
Tiptroni10
14th May 2018
0
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This generation is soft enough already without making them any softer .. Money for genuine good causes only please !!!
Pam1960
12th May 2018
3
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Putting the £10k to one side most of the comments are saying younger people want everything for nothing, are lazy and do not want to work. I am not sure where you are meeting these youngsters. The majority of young people I know as friends of my children and also as work colleagues differ very much to this opinion. More than half are working at least two jobs to pay for high private rentals and also trying to save for a house deposit. On top of this they are having to pay student loans. One work colleague leaves home at 7am to get to work for 8:30. At 5pm he leaves to go to his 2nd job which he leaves at 11pm. He works every other weekend. He and many others do this to build a future for themselves. They havent asked for the £10k and I don't think putting down the younger generation is very constructive. They are a product of us. If their ideas and work ethic is not up to everyone's high standards maybe we should look at ourselves as we are the ones responsible for their upbringing.
jeanmark
13th May 2018
2
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Pam, I don't disagree with what you have said because my experience of younger people is the same. Like you, I recognise the suggestion didn't come from young people, but I think older people resent the assumption that they can afford to pay more to help the young when many parents and grandparents do help their own.

It appears to have been forgotten that many of us have all been there. Most of us didn't have it easy and whilst accepting things have changed, todays youngsters are really facing similar problems to what we had to face. It just appears that their expectations are different to what ours were and maybe that is where the problems lay. Incidentally, both my parents each had two jobs to try and make ends meet and so did most of their friends. We just thought that was the norm and accepted it.
Pam1960
13th May 2018
1
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I agree that the assumption that older people can afford to pay more to subsidise the younger generation is wrong. In fact I would assume that only a very small percentage could. My issue is that young people haven't asked for this money. I dislike the generalisation that they are lazy.i dont agree with giving 10k to them only the comments sbout the young. Not from you Jeanmark you are always very fair and insightful with your comments. Most of us have struggled over the years to build a home without help from the government and that will always be the case. If parents can afford to help out that is great if not then they will just have to get on with it as we did.
Lionel
13th May 2018
1
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I posted way down below that it is unwise to lump every young person into the same group. They're not all the same, anymore than we were.

Although I didn't have kids myself I've spent well over 40 years raising other people's difficult kids. Some in my home and some in the Scouts etc., One lad, a right tearaway, I raised with the help of his father. Taught him to read, write etc., Nobody gave that lad a chance. But he has for the ten years been not just a motor mechanic but an automotive engineer with BMW in Bavaria. I also raised his brother who now is a hopeless drunk.

We may not justly group youngsters all together. No.

And, most certainly i take your point that these young people didn't ask for this hand out. No, it was a failed Tory minister now working for a Quango!

Pam, I'm with you, I know good youngsters and bad. The good will make their way no matter what. The others we may only encourage in good things.
Gertrude49
12th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
I think that too much money is demanded up front from our younger generation. The cost of further education has become far too high and they are landed with debt the minute they start earning a salary worth giving the name! It is hard to save for a mortgage when you are saddled that young with that sort of repayment. The price of housing has shot up because we are allowing people who are not even resident in our country to buy up chunks of it and then sit on it for a very long time Ditto many building firms! We could reduce the cost of Uni - or raise the level of income at which payback is demanded and build eco-friendly starter homes with low running costs that they can use for a fixed period before having to move on. Stop foreign investors buying land - other countries have extremely strict rules that protect their people from such chicanery. Also make it very hard for builders to hog land or wriggle out of their social housing obligations. That should help the kids a great deal more than a handout that could go on who knows what?
Denys1954
12th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
When my wife and I started out we were both working full time and we bought our first house for £7,500, We started-out with everything but the bed either second hand or hand built by my farther and myself, we had no TV for the first 3 years and then it was a portable black and white. We saved money by staying in and anywhere we did go we would walk, I even cycled to work 7 miles each way on an old ladies bike for the first 3 years.

The young ones of today want every latest gadget, they don't understand the meaning of walking and horror of horrors if they have to make anything themselves. I don't think they have it any harder than we did when we were young. I have worked an average of 60 hours a week most of my life and even now at 64 I am still doing a 48 hour week. more now because of my job not the money. I was a "baby boomer" but not to an affluent family, whatever I wanted I had to work for.
viking
12th May 2018
3
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Snowflakes do not want to work to earn the deposit. These days older folk must not mention" saving up" it is the dirtiest work and is like a red rag to a snowflake. Every thing must be immediate, and unfortunately buying a property is definately not immediate, so that causes much grinding of teeth and a large helping of any sort of drug.
My wife and I had five jobs between us to get together the deposit on a house. Mentioning this to younger generation and there usually is a long delay in replying as the brain kicks in with the excuses.
Pam1960
12th May 2018
0
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What is a snowflake?
HeatherB9
12th May 2018
0
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I have two sons both went to university and studied hard . One is going on to do a masters to help him find a good job,and the other is now an officer in the army. Both young men are starting life with debts from university ,as we are not wealthy. They will be paying out for years to come,plus any rent or mortgage in the future. I feel they need help now,as it is really hard just to get by in life. Also take note of young adult suicide rates,there is definitely a connection between what they feel they can do and how hard it will be to achieve their future dreams! They need help NOW,
Fruitcake13
11th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
I'm a baby boomer and I'm still paying for my mortgage, thanks to now almost ex husband serving this country for 22 years in the RAF which meant we were moved around the UK and abroad constantly. Did we get a £10k 'gift'?? Nope!
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Fruitcake, I don't think our youngsters will get £10,000 gratis. This is a bit of political chicanery from a failed Tory Minister.

We haven't got the money to pay our youngsters so they can't have it. Besides, the Grey Vote which keeps the Tories afloat in Whitehall wouldn't tolerate it.
Fruitcake13
11th May 2018
1
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Well, Lionel, you could be right. I rather hope you are.
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
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Fruitcake, there just isn't the money ninth pot to do this. It's like borrowing from mum to pay the tallyman. Yes, I'm that old!

We just haven't got it.

And the person who's idea this is might wonder why he failed as an MP. Good riddance I say, they ain't having none of my cash.
Fruitcake13
12th May 2018
1
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Maybe those of us who reached 60 only to find we have to wait until we're 66 to get our old age pensions are providing the 'pot' for these youngsters to get their £10,000?
JardineS
11th May 2018
4
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Can't ever remembering getting any help from anyone, nor did we expect any. We didn't have posh cars, exotic holidays or everything brand new. We lived on what we could afford which often wasn't much by the time all the bills were paid. Most of us have been working from 15, and have contributed to the system all our lives, and on small wages. Women were paid a lot less than men. It would seem to me that the Government would be more than happy for us all to pop our clogs once we finally retire (providing they don't move it again).
It would seem to be more and more that the elderly are deemed as a burden to society, not wanted and in the way. Not appreciated for their many many years of hard work and contribution to society.
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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Jardine, it has always been the case the elderly are a burden on society. It's just that now it's enshrined in law! Oh, you won't find it easily because it's in the small print. Always beware the small print.

Once upon a time families would look after their old folk. Not so these days. They believe they pay the State to do that. I wonder what things will be like in their old age?

My wife and I are looking 68 in the face. She has MS. For the most part we must take care of each other. And we do. I first paid National Insurance at 14, as a paper boy, Haven't stopped since until I retired. We live on our pensions, there's nothing else now having bailed out my wife's daughter and her family.. And now grand kids want money for iPhones.

no chance darlings, go find a job!
JardineS
12th May 2018
0
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I do believe Governments haven't helped by saying the pension is a benefit. When we all know it's not. I also think by constantly saying how much care cost's , has also done a great deal of harm. Youngsters look at the elderly forgetting that they were also young once, worked, had children, paid bills and contributed. All they see are old people who are in the way. We were all brought up to respect our elders, and we did, no question that was how it was.
My husband will shortly be 80 and luckily is in reasonable health other than being rather creaky, as I often point out it could be worse. I still have another 4 yrs before I can retire. I work in care, which is hard hard work, I work nights and I also run my own grooming business, s0 I feel I have more than done my fare share.
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
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Far from going some way to heal the breech between the generations it is actually opening up a great divide between us. So much for a politician's meddling!

The many comments below bring to life the massive disconnect between us and our children and grand children. But this Silver Surfers web page has provided a place for us to air our views. It's helped us know we're not alone, not isolated and odd.

In our younger days 'the generation gap' was a common saying. Our parents didn't understand us. Today, with my step grand children it's more like five generation gap. I don't understand their language, don't understand the text speak they use when texting me, don't understand what motivates them and, well, frankly don't understand them at all.

We had 'have now and pay later.' They have 'have now and let someone else pay.' I don't recall we were all victims but it seems so many of our grand children see themselves as just that - victims who need a shoulder to cry on and massive support just to stop crying.

But my wife and I are also friends with some youngsters who take a very different view. They will do whatever it takes to be a success in their chosen field. They're not victims needing hanky, no, these are the winners by a long length. I'll back them to win.

Just as we had to make some sense out of a nation just emerging from the early Post War years, so also our grand kids must make sense of their times. There will be some spectacular winners and, I'm sorry to say, an awful lot of specular losers. I've losers in my family.
Alicia
11th May 2018
4
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Ridiculous idea, they will spend it on drink and drugs. My husband and I have worked for everything we have got and never had handouts from anyone.
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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We're in the same place as you. But please bear in mind, this daft idea comes from a think tank, not Whitehall. No one in this present government would dare float such an idea for fear of losing at the next election.
Blackdan
11th May 2018
4
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I don't see how giving them £10,000 is going to get them on the housing ladder, how much of a house would that buy. They still have to continue to pay the rest after they have got it. I think the Government should be making builders build more affordable homes and not just a percentage which the builders then change. Example if the builders are building 200 homes then 100 should be affordable and they shouldn't be allowed to alter that amount.
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
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Where's the land coming from for more housing? We have a choice, feed ourselves in part with home grown high quality food or import inferior food stuffs from abroad.

100 years ago our agriculture could support about fifteen million people. We now have well in excess of eighty million residents. Forget the great strides made in productivity, that only comes at the cost of quality. I know I was in agriculture for a good few years. I know what goes on.

The choice we have is vastly reduce the numbers on this island or build more housing. If we choose the latter then we must buy food on the world market. That, I can tell you, is expensive and highly volatile, just like the oil market.
JR73
11th May 2018
4
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Silliest idea I have ever heard in 77 years on this planet!
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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Alron
11th May 2018
5
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This is a problem created by Government and Business, too much reliance on cheap labour from abroad, instead of creating apprenticeships, teacher training and nurse training from the beginning. Too much emphasis on expensive university education while grassroots training of our own would be more beneficial. The result is low wages, unemployment and a HOUSING SHORTAGE !
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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You speak a truth, Alron. Got anything more to add, I'd be keen to hear it.
freewheeler
11th May 2018
3
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I think it is preposterous to even contemplate this idea, but then again the lunatics are running the asylum.
To blame this on the so called "Baby Boomers" men and women who died for the betterment of this country, left at a low end and without the financial means worked their socks off to improve the country and their own well-being.

What is different now is the complete lack of jobs available to you school, college and university leavers unless you are of the privileged few, but I lay the blame for this at the governments door with a lack of vision and along with businesses encourage greed to the detriment of the people of the UK.

I cannot believe that in this day and age, we are still paying what is called the "Minimum / Living Wage" that is exactly the equivalent of what what getting paid as an average salary almost 30 years ago.

Who are the winners I hear you ask? well certainly not the majority of the workers in the UK.
We have become the cheap labour of the globe, business and government on focus on short to mid-term profit/solutions and to build a stable and future platform has to be that the focus is on the longer term.

We should have a business community tax payable by all large scale and multi-national business to be used in the development of the communities for skills, job creation and educational programs etc.

I must also say that in some instances parents have basically stopped parenting... we need to instil belief in our children, responsibility, accountability and good manners and start asking where they are at night.

I am sorry for rambling on so long, but I get frustrated and annoyed at the country blindly sleepwalking while governments and business blindside us with trivial issues to distract us from what is really happening.
LesleyR35
11th May 2018
2
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Agree with majority Freewheeler. This is a blatant political move by a weak government who are using desperate measures to take our attention away from much more important issues and policies. £10,000 wouldn't get anyone on the property ladder and sends a negative message to every one.
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
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That's a pretty broad canvas you paint freewheeler, but haven't read anything I could disagree with. Well said.
livingdoll35
11th May 2018
3
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Oh no - not more free hand-outs|! I think there are too many people given free handouts which they have not earned, unlike previous generations who had it tough but had to struggle through as best they could (with no financial help or otherwise) and I certainly don't agree that pensioners who have been thrifty and saved to keep themselves in their later years should be taxed more to pay for gifts to young people who depend on benefits {and not hard work and perseverance) who must learn to stand on their own two feet and deal with reality. After all, if there are some better off pensioners, it's not because of handouts, but through sheer hard work and determination in their working lives and their pride to only accept what they have earned. This younger generation will grow up expecting everything to be handed to them on a silver platter. They do not realise that all the benefits that they enjoy today were provided by the earlier hard working generations. What will they contribute to future generations, or will they too learn to hold out their hands and expect their every wish to be granted with no effort from them? We will end up with a spoilt generation who will expect to get everything they want, when they want it. It's time this government toughened up and put some backbone into our future generations instead of namby pambying them. No wonder they think that world owes them a living when the politicians just let things slide and go along with the status quo. Let's put some backbone into our young people and give them something to be proud of that they are part of. A bit of discipline never did anyone any harm.
freewheeler
11th May 2018
3
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Totally agree with your sentiments. as Freddy Mercury sang "It's a hard life" or so the younger generation think. We now live in a society of do gooders and political correctness which is actually doing more harm than good.
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
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junentony
11th May 2018
3
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If they did without technology and nights out like we had to do to save our deposits, we had nothing to start with and hard work got us what little we have today we don't have any savings to give away we only have our house....
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
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We no longer have savings either, despite doing without much to secure an ex-council house as our home. We raised two grand children (step grand kids to me) for 12 years and hoped to give them a start. The eldest, a girl, has iPhones, iPads etc., and is awake all night. We know because my wife is an insomniac and sometimes looks at Facebook. She just quit college after a year saying it's too hard and she's going to get a job. Fat chance!

Her brother wants to be a YouTube blogger.

Despite a privileged upbringing I went to work on farms. That's before so many mechanical aids made it easier. Didn't earn much but my heart was truly in what I did. I loved every moment.

As a Postman I could save a little and later as a truck driver I could save more. That's how my second wife and I afforded an ex-Council house.

This house is all we have but it's enough. One of life's great blessings is to be contented, and we are.

I just wonder if my step grand children will ever be content?
ChristineN6
11th May 2018
4
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They need to learn to save for things like we did. And just how many would put it towards a house?Most would go on holidays, drink, new car etc
Lionel
11th May 2018
4
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It's in sorrow I say you're probably right. But a few will use it to best effect.
ElaineN
11th May 2018
2
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Tory “so the young voters are preferring Labour”.
Tory Friend “ let’s think of a way to make them think we are on their side”.
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
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Brendabillington
11th May 2018
2
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Ludicrous idea I was bir. In 1954 and thought originally I would receive my pension at 60 the. It changed to 63 then when the change of police in 2011 I now have to wait until 65 and nine months it is a disgrace. WASPI are doing all they can bit getting nowhere.
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
If the State can come up with this sort of money it should go to women who have been denied their pensions. Fact!
Newone
11th May 2018
1
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I’ve worked really hard to get my pension, I’ve already had to wait 5 years longer for it being a woman born in 1953. This is a ludicrous idea!
Jean177
11th May 2018
1
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What a hare-brained idea ; have the powers that be totally lost their marbles? A lot of today’s young have been brought up to get everything they want , they do not seem to understand that you have to work in order to save money for a deposit for a house . I know jobs are scarce but they are out there ,and maybe youngsters should made to take what ever is on offer and give them a try . I worked for 40 years in the NHS and I know what hard work is : I am enjoying my pension now but I earned every penny of it . I try to help my family and grandchildren in small ways but they have to learn that hard work brings its own financial rewards and save to buy their own houses if they want to be home owners . Perhaps the law needs changing over rental charges and a cap put on todays extortionate fees.
Lionel
11th May 2018
1
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Hare-brained? Yes, as an old countryman this mades hares look clever!
mccollmbe
11th May 2018
1
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I am shocked that this has even been proposed. Lord willets in my opinion is trying to create a wedge between younger and older generation. 3.6 million women have been deprived.of up to 6 years pension which they have contributed to over 40 years.intergenerational fairness I think not. Ask a WASPI woman to vote on this and I think you will find the answer is a big fat NO on the vote !! Beyond furious at this proposal. I had been working ten years at age 25. They are two long in education now. I saved money and paid for my keep at home from the day I started work. I paid fory own car and paid for my own property. 15% mortgage. Where will I end ? Furious at theft of my pension does not sum it up !
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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Well said. I agree.
Fruitcake13
11th May 2018
1
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I'm in an even worse position, not only deprived of a full 6 years state pension, but will only get the basic amount anyway thanks to being a military spouse. Not that I chose that life as my soon to be ex husband decided to join the RAF after we'd been married for a few years and had two very small children, the younger child was barely 6 months old, so constantly being moved around in and out of the UK and, therefore, I had to take any crappy and badly paid temporary job I could get. Thought I was lucky if I managed to get any work at all, as employers are (understandably) very reluctant to take on military wives who will have to leave a job with very little or even no notice. I, therefore, had no chance whatsoever of a career or of any kind of future work related pension at all.

Added to that, no parents, in-laws, nor any relatives whatsoever anywhere nearby, not even in the same country much of the time, so no family to rely on to help out with childcare. Husband was often sent off somewhere for weeks, or months, at a time, so I was in the same position as a single mother, but with no family around and constantly changing neighbours who were, therefore, effectively total strangers.

I think special provisions re pension payments for military spouses should have been made, we have, after all, sacrificed a lot for Queen and Country that civilians take for granted. How difficult would it be to have given 'pension credits' to military spouses for the years spent either out of the UK or unable to hold down a job for any length of time thanks to being constantly moved around at the Government's choosing. If they can afford hand outs to millennials who have contributed next to nothing.....I rest my case, M'Lud!
mccollmbe
12th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I fully sympathise with you and hope your solicitor is making provision fr9m your ex services pension. I thought I had read about a scheme for service spouses. I think you should look at the DWP website about picking up extra NI contributions for yourself. I will have a look and see if I can find a link
Fruitcake13
12th May 2018
0
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Thank you for that info. Why on earth did the Armed Forces not bother to tell us about this?! I'd better hold off on the divorce, as it reads as though we have to be still married, which we are currently. Thanks again, much appreciated.
Fruitcake13
12th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Actually, re-reading it, it seems it does apply in retrospect. Whew! Thanks again.
mccollmbe
12th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Glad I have added something positive to your day ! Get involved in your local waspi campaign group if you haven't already !!
Fruitcake13
12th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
There's a WASPI group not too far from me, I'm not a member, but I do read their column every week in the local rag.
PamW2
11th May 2018
3
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My husband and I married in 1969 after a three year engagement when we saved every single penny we could for a deposit on a small bungalow. The bungalow was £4200 and deposit £750. Our joint earnings were £20 per week. We went out with friends once a week for a cheapish evening, no foreign travel, a very old car and by the time we were married had absolutely no spare cash so no honeymoon. The only new item of furniture we had was a dressing table, no TV, no washing machine etc. We were very happy just being together. Over the years we had three children, losing our first born to a brain tumour when she was 2. We have received no benefits except family allowance and when I left work to have the children we had no maternity pay and lost our jobs. Both of us worked extra hours to keep our family afloat especially when the interest rate went up from 8% to 15%!!
We paid National Insurance contributions all through our working life and contributed to occupational pensions which now leave us comfortably off. We moved house twice and our current house is worth over £400,000. We have helped our two sons to purchase their houses and have been very pleased to do so. We certainly never received any financial help from our parents.
I am not tarring all young people with the same brush but feel very strongly that they do tend to think they are hard done by and are not prepared to give up a good lifestyle to save some money! Give up the new cars on finance, manicures, expensive beauty treatments, tattoos, foreign holidays, binge drinking etc.
It's very expensive to rent flats or houses and difficult to find the money then to save for a deposit but with interest rates as low as they are now there is no better time to get on the property ladder.
We will be livid if we have to pay more tax to pay for this ridiculous idea!!
Pensioners seem to get blamed for everything when it was banks and politicians who have caused the situation today when houses are so expensive.
mccollmbe
11th May 2018
3
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Agree all you say !!
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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Quite right! My background is similar to yours.
MilesC
11th May 2018
3
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This is a really silly idea that does nothing to address the problems facing young people today. This incompetent and uncaring government needs to stop cutting vital services for the young and vulnerable and focus on improving funding for education, careers advice, apprenticeship schemes and give the youngsters help where it is most beneficial in the early stages of their lives. Dropping a tax free bonus of ten grand into their laps at 25 is just a PR stunt that solves nothing and will, in fact, make matters worse.
The sooner people stop voting for these self-serving parasites the better. Time for a government for the many, not the few.
Gillymac
11th May 2018
1
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Hear hear couldn’t have said it better myself .
linj
10th May 2018
4
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Really cross this evening. Have just watched ambulance on the telly. How on earth can the powers that be suggest millennial be given £10k when ambulances are queuing with their patients on board because they haven’t got the room in the hospital to admit them. Somebody somewhere needs to get their priorities right.
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
It's called politics, linj, not in any way connected with our reality.
ecarg
10th May 2018
4
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We moaned when our parents said'in my day' and now we do the same. It's unfair society moves on for better or worse and people will take help if offered that is not to say it is an expectation.How that help is delivered is a government decision and many have offered alternative use of funds which would be beneficial.Bank of Mum and Dad again should not be an expectation or an obligation
The debate has been lively considering no one is actually going to receive the £10,000.
We might debate winning the lottery next!
GaryM68
10th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
Why should they get 10k when we worked hard for more than 40 years paying tax and NI contributions to get our pensions. We started with nothing having hand me downs when we had our 1st property and struggled financially when our children were young so why shouldn’t we reap the rewards in our later years. I know it’s tough for youngsters but no tougher than it was for us and they have far more than we did at their age. My children have survived and worked hard for what they have so why don’t the others do the same.
Lionel
10th May 2018
2
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Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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Well said. But I disagree it's so tough for youngsters. So many of them are the architects of their own misfortunes. Not all by any means.
Fruitcake13
12th May 2018
0
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I couldn't agree more.
linj
10th May 2018
6
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Somebody somewhere has totally lost the plot. What a ridiculous idea.
Lionel
10th May 2018
3
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Yes, and the man responsible is a former high ranking Cabinet Minister!
RobinaI
10th May 2018
4
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I would prefer the saving scheme , where when they save some themselves they then get help. Even if they were then richly rewarded !
Cdjsa
10th May 2018
7
Thanks for voting!
I am a tax paying pensioner who is also disabled. Started married life in a bed sit sharing a kitchen and bathroom with another couple. Worked hard and saved hard and finally bought our own home with two rooms only furnished with second hand furniture. We had no car, tv fridge washing machine or Hoover. No holidays except a visit to a relative who lived at the coast. Now live in a nice house with savings, but after the death of my husband last year am now living in one room in the house and am paying about £25,000 a year for care, and they want me to pay extra tax to give £10k to 25 year olds. How do you think I voted?
Lionel
10th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
'and they want me to pay extra tax to give £10k to 25 year olds.'

I doubt you've much to worry about. This was a crazy idea spouted from a tin pot quango with no teeth. If this matter was even discussed in Cabinet the Tories would be out of office because it's the grey vote that put them in.

It does amaze me though. May's government has come out with some taxation policies I would have expected to come from Labour. Perhaps the Tories are leaning to the Left. I hope not!
Coach1946
10th May 2018
9
Thanks for voting!
If you haven't earned it, you can't have it. That was my parents view, and I share that view.
Lionel
10th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
My Victorian grand parents drilled into me: never a borrower nor lender be. Sound advice which I've stuck to, apart from a mortgage.
Wilf
12th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
DallasM
10th May 2018
8
Thanks for voting!
Why should they be handed it on a plate. Let them make do without, holidays, the most up to date state of art technology, cars, going out all the time. If they can do that they might be better off
Our age group worked hard, scrimped and saved for what we have. We made do and managed with what little while bringing up our children so we could afford a house and future, it made us appreciate what we have.
Lionel
10th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
That's the point. Not all, but very many, of our grand children's generation have had so much given them without working for it that they don't appreciate what they have. I'm sure they see parents and grand parents as cash cows supplying their every want. It's that way in my family.

I say again not all of them. I do know some youngster who are grafting hard to get where they want to go, but that in the face of staggering odds. My wife and I try to encourage them whenever we can.
Lionel
10th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I'm afraid doing without is just not in their culture so these youngsters, and it's not all of them, will do anything to get what they want. That's the voice of experience.
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Yes, Dallas, we do appreciate what we have because we damn well worked for it. That's the only way a human will ever appreciate anything - work hard for it.

I think I sound a like a really old man there. Perhaps I am!
[deleted]
10th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Lionel
10th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Free bus travel is OK if there's any public transport around you. The nearest bus to us is six miles away so we need a car to get it. Then there's parking charges while we're away ... cheaper to use the car.

I agree there's many better places to put the money, but that money will only be available through a rise in taxation. A rise in prisoner's taxes and that just ain't gonna be popular with us.

I doubt much will come of this hare brained scheme. It's the Grey Vote the Tories rely on to get them to Downing Street. They're not going to be keen to upset us.
Pete H
10th May 2018
7
Thanks for voting!
While I do help and will continue to help my children when I can at least my handouts to them are closely monitored by me so that they can only be spent on something worthwhile like a deposit for a house or education.

Who would monitor these £10k handouts to the massed ranks of self obsessed, free spending millennials?? I imagine the craft gin, speciality coffee, smashed avocado establishments and Apple stores would be rubbing their hands with glee at the prospect of such a windfall!! All paid for by us.

This mad idea would do nothing to rebalance the wealth between generations.

I wouldn't have trusted myself with that amount of money at that age .... and nothing much has changed!
Wilf
10th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I feel sorry for many of the Millennials pete as the property prices are out of reach. I would have loved to have had £10,000 at 25 unfortunately in those days you ate Apples, Craft gin was not around, I had never heard of an Advocado and even if I did why smash it surely thats vandelism? and as for speciality coffee we just had nescafe at 10 old pence a cup ion the local Greasy Joes cafe!
Lionel
10th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I loved that post, Wilf. Thank you.

I believe the distortions in the property market are a matter of design by government rather than just pure greed. Individual property ownership in Europe is rare. I read somewhere recently 78% of Germans rent all their lives. But, it seems rentals are at a much lower level there than they are here.

I was very fortunate when in farming. There was always a tied cottage for which the highest rental I ever paid was £1.50 a week. When the marriage broke up I moved back to London for work as a trucker. My first room, in 1996, cost me £85 a week. I can't imagine what that room would fetch now.

Yes, I too sympathise with our youngsters, deeply sympathise with them. But when, as it seems to me, it's a deliberate government policy over several parliaments to allow house prices to go through the ceiling by not building homes it leaves our youngsters as victims.
BarbaraB788
10th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
How nice to know I am not alone
I do not think the millenniums deserve a £10,000
handout.
As many on here have said we didn't get handouts. I married my husband in 1967 we where both 18. My husband was an apprentice HGV mechanic. His wage was very low. We lived with my in-laws for six months and then six months with my father. Managed to find a house to rent and moved in with our new baby. The kitchen was a room with an old chair in the corner which had a sink sat on it. A cold water tap above that. The back door had a two inch gap under it.
We had furniture donated by family (cast offs) but we where so happy to have our own home. We saved hard and manage to but a sink unit. Had gone into debt for a gas cooker. After a while we had saved enough to to buy a wall cupboard. We needed one to put our food where the mice couldn't get at it. Our windows where single glazed and our source of heat was a coal fire. We tried to light the fire every day but sometimes couldn't afford coal. An outside toilet down the yard. We often went hungry but the priority was to keep a roof over our heads.
After a couple of years and another baby we moved to an overspill town into a new house ! It was paradise. We had hot and cold water, till single glazing and warm air central heating downstairs. A bathroom and a downstairs toilet. The floor was tiled right through so no need to worry about carpet. Upstairs we had bare floor boards. After renting for three years we where able to buy the house. We lived their for 18 yrs. during this time my husband set up his own vehicle repair business with a friend. A week later my son was born. My husband worked seven days a week which wasn't easy for me. He came home each day ate our evening meal and then it would be bed time for the children.
Life was very hard but things did get easier.
I knitted clothes for my children and went to jumble sales. I still buy most of my clothes on eBay I love a bargain.
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
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Well done. You made it through.
It matters
10th May 2018
7
Thanks for voting!
Will these be the babies that got the ISA when they were born this was to help with their education.
Is this money a gift to be spent freely, whilst most will spend the money wisely, I am sure that it will cause more problems for the country by the less well educated who will go on a spending spree and have nothing to show for it within 12 months.
PaulineS24
10th May 2018
9
Thanks for voting!
I am sick of being called a baby boomer ( born 1959). I am not rich and I worked my arse off to buy a house and car etc. Lived with 2nd hand stuff for years. I'm sick of my youngest being called a millennial (born 1985). She works her but off and doesn't expect things to be handed to her on a plate. And why should pensioners "wealth" be plundered when they have worked and earned that priviledged? Just to fund the lazy I want it now generation. And I'm not tarring all with the same brush
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Sadly, all governments look to us because we own the greatest slice of the national wealth. No one in power takes account of the fact we worked to earn and buy our houses etc., oh no, it's just that on paper we've got the wealth and the State is gonna deprive us of it.
Fruitcake13
12th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Totally agree with you. I'm a so-called 'baby boomer' too, and I'm not rich. Still paying a mortgage and never had a penny in state benefits my entire life, apart from 'family allowance' for my two children when they were small, which everyone got, rich or poor. Started with second hand stuff which we had for years just like you, there was no shame in that as most of us started out that way then. Both of my children (and their spouses) work hard and have never had state benefits in their lives either.
HazelT9
10th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
I'm a baby boomer born in 1954. Yes I have my own house which I worked hard for while raising two children on my own. I worked for 46 years and have no pension until I'm 66 years old. Many like me are now struggling financially because our state pension age was moved more than once. Why should we finance payments to 25 year olds some of which have never worked a day in their lives.
CaroleAH
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
It's a crazy idea! I'm intrigued by the idea that David Willets and his cronies think/know that there are so many rich pensioners out there who could fund all this. As Yodama has said, rich people whether they are young or old always have ways and means of evading or minimising their tax liability - in other words - they hang on to their money. And - who decides at what income level a well-to-do pensioner becomes a rich pensioner? One thing I do know is that I will never fall into either category!!! 🙂
When I was 15, and still at school, I got a job on a market stall working 8 hours on a Saturday for £1.00 ( no pocket money from my parents) then in 1967 when I was 17 I went to work for Lloyds Bank for £6 a week. Out of that, £3 went to my mother, £1 on bus fares to work and the occasional sandwich for lunch which left me with £2 a week to buy my clothes, shoes, trips to the cinema etc plus I had to save for birthday and Christmas presents and somehow I managed. I certainly wasn't the exception - we all did it and we all had an excellent work ethic. When I got married in 1969 our house, which we had scrimped and saved for, was furnished with second-hand furniture and we had bare floorboards for many months until we had saved up enough for some carpet. Nowadays, the youngsters think nothing of spending £100 or more on a night out in clubs or pubs, £10 for a packet of cigarettes or hundreds of pounds to go to a music festival to wallow in the mud. They have their expensive mobile phones, iPads, designer clothes and shoes, long-haul holidays and yet they want more - as long as they don't have to save for it. Having said that, I'm sure that there are many young people out there who do work hard and who are desperate to get on the housing ladder so surely, instead of giving every 25 year old £10K couldn't there be a scheme where the ones who make a regular commitment to save over a few years could have £10K added to their deposit when they have sufficient funds to buy a property? In that way, they wouldn't actually get their hands on the money and fritter it away. Or, why not build affordable, basic housing and only sell it to first-time buyers?
Lionel
10th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
I must say, Carole, your post above quite touched me.

Summarising your post, I'm against feeding this demon of greed, this demon of self. There's a clear choice in life: build for the future or live for now. Sadly too many youngsters, but by no means all, live for now. We may thank John Lennon for that! Oh, and the advertising and marketing industries.

It's odd to me, we who lived through the Cold War, the threat of impending nuclear destruction at any moment, we built for the future. Yet our grand kids generation who have no such threat hanging over them build for the moment. I just don't understand this reversion.

I believe our children and grand children have lost sight of a basic principle of life. Start small and work to get wealth; that's wealth in whatever form.

In my day farm work didn't pay well but it was where my heart lie. We endured cold winters in grossly inadequate cottages where sometimes even a bath was a luxury. But, with my first wife's help, I made it to better things. Isn't this the way of life, not all up front and beggar tomorrow?

I do believe hardship makes the person.
CaroleAH
10th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Thank-you, Lionel. It was a bit - well more than a bit really - of a rant but I just get so annoyed by the unreal expectations of many of today's young people. I forgot to say that out of my £1.00 Saturday money I used to buy my Mum a bunch of flowers for 2/6d from the stall next to the one I worked at 🙂 She certainly deserved them as she had three of us, my sister and I are twins and an older sister, and managed to keep us all clean with no washing-machine or spin dryer - everything was hand washed and then put through an old fashioned mangle. Just imagine all those nappies!!!
Lionel
11th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Rant to your heart's content Carole, it's always good to read. We come from the same root, although are now different branches, so I understand you.

We are told in the Book to bring up children in the way they should go. We haven't done that. The price? Isaiah says quite early in that book that we will be ruled by children. Are we ever ruled by children today?

I was raised by Jewish grand parents and a Jewish mother - imagine Maureen Lipman on steroids, and she was little better in old age! - but the point is I was taught the way to go. I've tried with my step grand children but it's not that way anymore. They just shrugged and walked away.

Having raised two of this rather feeble generation, my step grand children, I just cannot see them ever enduring the hardships you faced or I did on farms. Mention work and they're already running away. I don't exaggerate here.

But we got through it all; yes we suffered a little, sometimes hurt a little, and looked to a better future. You reached that future and so did I. But these kids. They start from a point we couldn't imagine and hope for more.

Yes, we are ruled by children.
CaroleAH
11th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
The thing is, Lionel, when I was young I didn't think that I was hard done to or that anyone owed me a living - it was just how it was and we all got on with it but youngsters today seem to think that unless they have all the latest gadgets and can get legless every weekend (and what an awful spectacle they present!) then there is something wrong with their lives. That is a bit of a sweeping generalisation but as in most walks of life, those that complain most get the most attention.
Lionel
11th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Carole, my first eight years with my mother and grand parents we had no piped water and no electricity. It became my job to go to the well at the top of the yard and pump water. We had Tilley lamps in winter and an open fire. But that was way back in the fifties.

Transplanted to London I didn't know what a flush toilet was. My mother taught me to swing on the chain!

Last year I needed to replace the downstairs toilet pan. The grand kids arrived mid way through. You should have heard their anguish at needing to ascend the stairs to the upstairs toilet, oh, dear, it was pitiful.

My step grand daughter, now 17, broke four iPhone screens last year through sheer carelessness. They're £100 each to replace in an Apple store. Being tight with money (I've never made a secret of that), I refused to contribute. My nearly son-in-law paid for all four, hoping, I think, to ingratiate himself with her. It didn't work. She's a consumer of people as well as things. Her phone is attached to her by an invisible cord.

Dinner time at our home is a nightmare for the kids. We take their phones off them, turn them off and I tell them, the first moan I hear and both phones are flushed away!

Our grand kids don't seem to get drunk but other substances I cannot say.

Yours is not a sweeping generalisation at all. If I go to our local market town six miles away tonight ... well, I'm not going to say. Suffice it to say as a farm stockman for many years I;m not easily embarrassed but when I see in town, as we call it, near brings me to tears.
DeborahP5
9th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
we bought our first home,had second hand furniture,No television and no nights out Our mortgage went to 15% .. we couldnt afford holidays etc.... We both worked whilst bringing up 3 children and made our own way in life. No tax credits or any help .
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Well done Deborah. You may now hold your head high and say I did it!

That's a good feeling.
SueE7
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
We worked hard for what we've got. We went without and started small. Let them do the same
Lionel
10th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
That's the way it was for me too, in farming, but without the kids.
spedders
9th May 2018
2
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This is just another attempt by a far right think tank to put up spurious cases for taxing the many while ensuring the few pay minimum amounts of tax on their excessive incomes.
Lionel
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Yep! Good thinking.
ChrisC51
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
The question is so loaded. For ‘doing nothing’! No wonder it is 95% against.

I think a payment would be a good idea but would prefer much lower fees at university. Or as a business start up. Or towards the cost of accommodation.
Lionel
10th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Your idea leaves us with a problem. If our young people have it all now what is there to aim for? Surely it's the striving for something better, the hardship endured that makes the person. Well, it was in my case and seemingly a good few Silver Surfers.

So, no. Too much has been given this generation already. Too much for their long term well-being.
AnnH74
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
Born in 1935 we had it pretty hard going. Lived in the front room of Mums when we got married. Husband got £5.00 per week. WE LIVED IN RENTED ACCOMMODATION FROM 1955 TO 1963 when we could just manage the deposit on a house. We had boxes as furniture and gradually added things as we saved up. No washing machine, fridge or freezer, no central heating or double glazing. But we had real pleasure when we could afford something. Worked till 72 now on low state pension, do not get minimum because we were born before a certain date. Get off your asses like we had to
Christomargo
9th May 2018
9
Thanks for voting!
Nobody deserves £10,000 for doing nothing!
Lionel
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
PaulB24
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
Had to work for my money .
Lionel
11th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
JimS9
9th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
when i was working 3 jobs to feed my kids and keep a roof over their heads nobody offered me 10 grand
HeatherF1
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
I was a single mother in 1964; abandoned by the father of my cjild, and my parents. Life is not always easy, but hard work and determination will get you there if you want. No holidays, no car, no phone, a rented bedsit. But I made it. Now 3 more children, a successful career in NHS, two husbands and a very happy and successful retiremnet.
Work at it and enjoy the success, dont expect handouts from anyone, do it on your own and feel proud
Lionel
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
Heather, I was disinherited in my mid teens. At 67, everything I am, every thing I have is mine. I've grafted on farms, driven trucks endlessly and walked endless post round for Royal Mail. As a carer I've seen the end of life, wiping backsides, mopping vomit and cradling the dying in my arms.

I don't have much now, but what I have I've earned by my own labours, without state help.

Proud, no, but satisfied my life's work has not been in vain, yes I am.
It matters
10th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
You sound contented with your life, unlike some, who have spent their lives living off the nanny state and complain that life isn't fair. You should be proud, yourself, As a carer you will have given comfort to people, sometimes where a relative would not, think also of the birthday greeting and Christmas cards delivered that would put smiles on people's faces.
Lionel
10th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Thank you for your lovely, generous comment.
Pam1960
9th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
I would vote no however I would say that maybe I would look at things differently if I was a millennial. When I left school grants were available for education. I purchased my council house at a heavily discounted price and managed to progress further up the housing ladder. I have worked all my life to get what I have but if mobile phones, gadgetry and cheap holiday offers were available I would probably wanted them as being an every day necessity in life. I don't agree that giving away £10000 to all 25 year olds would solve any issues but before we label these young people as wanting everything for nothing and not being prepared to save for their future remember that we created this environment of plenty for most they have never known not having central heating, they have never shared a bedroom with a sibling nor have they ever experienced life without all the kitchen gadgets and modern technology. They cannot be criticised for wanting what they have had all there lives. The criticism should go to the bright spark who dreamt up this idea
HelenG61
9th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Inter-generational inequity exists and this imbalance will blight our future - all of us! I am not a silver surfer or a millenial but a hard working 50+ parent of teenagers.
Wilf
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Helen all of us 50s+ are Silversurfers I think! I agree we all want to look after our kids. the government needs to build a LOT more houses-more supply...same demand and prices fall. Simple really?
Lionel
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Wilf, perhaps the elephant in the room should be publicly addressed. Too many people on these islands.

You said as much about food, I'm saying it about housing and job opportunities.

I do believe so much of the sad attitude our youngsters have toward work etc., is because of a sense of hopelessness. People from Central Europe, for example, come here and take retail jobs when they have good degrees from their own country. Work places our youngster should be filling.

I don't agree with the notion of building so many more houses. Demand is at record levels because we have so many visitors to these islands, thereby excluding our own young people.

Sixteen years ago my step daughter was living in two small rooms in our bungalow, along with her husband and two babies. It's the nearest I've ever come to a slum. Local housing people didn't want to know her for reasons beyond her control. I wrote to Her Majesty the Queen.

Put simply I said, your Majesty, you are first the sitting monarch of the United Kingdom. If your United Kingdom cannot provide public housing for my step daughter, her husband and kids, then I must question my life long allegiance to the Crown. (I could go on ...)

Within six weeks my step daughter has the offer of a new build in which she still lives.

Wilf, where are all these new homes going to be built? Brown field sites are OK, perhaps, but building on Green belt or agricultural land is a definite NO NO.We need that for food unless we are to become a sprawling metropolis dependant on imported foodstuffs.
Chibi the pig
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
The government needs to put more money Local Authorities way.... Adult social care costs, fostering and affordable social housing are the responsibility of the Council not the Government...and social care costs are rocketing ....is it a post code lottery?
Wilf
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I agree with potholes in the roads and as you say affordable housing etc but money needs to be found and raising tax will be the only way
Wilf
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Totally agree Lionel but why not build on brown field sites and build tall not over greenm belt etc. look at Dubai or New Yorkj for inspiration. We could have a lot more high rises in cities and combine them with parks. Youngsters need homes and its the government who needs to sort this mess out. BUT at some point in the coming decades it will get sorted as all us old Silversurfers pop off and the youngsters become Silversurfers and live our propoties. The system will right itself in the circle of life!
Lionel
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I thought high rises were going out of fashion, being demolished in favour of, well, what was ... terraced houses.

Wilf, we must preserve something of the England we both know. This is what we all want to pas on to our youngsters. I'm not at all sure providing for incomers will preserve England.

Please don't read into my words what's not in the plain text. Sorry about having to make that statement but this is a difficult area.
PaulineS24
10th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Tax isn't the only way. We are taxed on everything anyway. Stop sending millions and millions abroad in foreign aid. Especially countries that have nuclear and space programmes there's you're social care money in one fell swoop
Wilf
10th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Very true and I agree with you. I am not sure that will be enough though
Wilf
10th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
I think they are going out of fashion Lionel but if we want to quickly build more property for youngsters especially it is a good solution.
Lionel
10th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
It will blight their lives because they are too selfish to listen to reason from those who have livd the hard life.

Sadly, these kids have a very hard time coming, the world is going to be very different and very soon. Just read the press.
Wheelbarrow1
9th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
My children had a far better start in life than I did, a better education and earn more now than I ever will. They will also inherit property whereas I did not have that luxury. When I got a mortgage for the first time the interest rate was 15%, but we worked hard and managed our finances tightly.
We will always do right by our children and come to their aid if needed.
As a 60 year old woman my pension has been stretched out to when I am 66, any private pension was ruined somewhat by the crash in 2008, I worked in a bank for 20 years and all the shares I had are now worth 65 pence instead of the £12 each I paid for them. I think my generation have been penalised enough.
Every generation has its problems but that is life and it is not always fair.
maureenr
9th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
The results of giving these snowflakes this money will be that house prices will rise and wipe out the benefit of giving them the money or they will throw the money away on holidays, electronic goods, alcohol and drugs.
We had to work hard for our money, long hours, manual labour, night school t improve our education and give us a chance on the career ladder. We had few nights out or luxury goods. we didn't own our 1st house until my hubby was in his mid thirties and we struggled hard to afford and keep that. I was almost 40 before I had my 1st holiday abroad.
It was only when we reached our 50's that we started to really feel the benefit of all this hard work.
We are now comfortable in our old age and can afford annual holidays abroad and a few treats each week but we are not rich.
DawnO2
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
We are reasonably well off now but both my children who are from the millennial s earn more than we ever did. They also both got given huge sums to help them onto the property ladder, we got nothing we also didn’t eat out, go on holidays and had second hand furniture. They want everything new and now, you actually appreciate things far more when it takes ages to get them. If we are better off now it’s because we had nothing and managed on a limited income so don’t have all the wants and desires of their generation. Maybe if they had to try living on the salary my husband and I did with no help from anyone else they might actually realise just how lucky they are.
NorfolkBroad
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Couldn't have worded it better Dawn! The only way we managed to buy a house was to save, save, save every penny we could - and not go for the 'perfect 4-bedder detached' from the get go!
Bramblebax
9th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
No I don't agree, I have worked since I was 16, am now 60 and should be enjoying my full state pension, I have paid full NI for 42 years and I can't get my state pension for another 6 years , I didn't get maternity benefit as it is today or any financial help with childcare as it is today and because i had part time jobs because if not being able to afford childcare, couldn't join an occupational pension, my state pension age was changed with less than 6 years notice and on top of all that my husband has been diagnosed with cancer, so far from being a rich pensioner the government have taken away over 40 thousand pounds from me, so NO I won't vote for this ridiculous idea
ecarg
9th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
No Lower university fees or bring back 100%mortgages ,give assistance but not hangouts.
I've Maggie Thatcher to thank for the fact I am a homeowner allowing me to purchase my house with a good discount and a 100% mortgage. A lot of help but I still had to help myself.
Purplebunny
9th May 2018
7
Thanks for voting!
I am over 70 and worked all my adult life, and still working part time. Our first house was in a dreadful state and needed rewiring, plumbing, woodworm treatment and new windows before we could even think of decorating, we had a one bar electric fire to heat the whole house. We scrimped and saved and did everything ourselves, it took over 8 years! The millennials want the same lifestyle, a house with everything from the start and need to learn that you need to work and go without luxuries and extras not have money given to them by the taxpayer. I am sure there are exceptions to this but sadly this seems to be the norm.
yahsue
9th May 2018
8
Thanks for voting!
Definitely not. Why not bring pensions up to an acceptable standard! Even better, give the WASPI women the 6 years money which was due to them, after all, they worked for it !!
Lionel
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I completely agree!
NixC
9th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
Absolutley ridiculous idea.
Chibi the pig
9th May 2018
-3
Thanks for voting!
I think we need to support the younger generation. Many leave university with debts of £30,000+, many job roles have disappeared off the planet and people live and work longer (men and women). How then can we compare apples with pears? It's a different world and a new set of rules and we have to acknowledge that. I agree with the comment that you cannot use a blanket policy but surely we should look into helping the next generation of workers, doctors nurses and carers get a foot on the first rung of the ladder?
Karenap
9th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
I totally agree. I have one son at home still desperately saving for a deposit on a house with his girlfriend and my married daughter in rented accommodation with her husband and 3 sons...her rent is so high they can't afford to save. We are different times now.
AvrilF9
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
I have to disagree Chibi, yes, so many students get into debt, but why choose ridiculous degree subjects instead of going for trade or professions that are required by the country. They get into almost unrepayable debt, But still can afford the iPhones, pubbing, clubbing and the like without considering the future. Why should I, as a 73 year old still working for myself to make ends meet, subsidise the feckless. If you really have to agree to the goverment giving each a £10,000 jolly gift,, DONT give cash, reduce the uni fees instead.
jeanmark
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Surely many of use older ones never had the chance of university, struggled to afford a mortgage in the days when only the mans wage was taken in to consideration, made do with odd and second hand things in the home and went without many things just to survive. Now we are told that because we worked hard and saved for our old age we are the better off and should help those who are younger and whose expectations are far higher that ours were?
Wilf
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I totally agree. Our kids are working hard but cannot make ends meet to buy a house.. I have said in another post here the government needs to build more houses and stop letting landlords accumulate property and then rent them out.
Wilf
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I am not sure I agree here. one of our kids has been to university and has stupid debts and has worked but this government is charging 6% interest on student debt? Now how dumb is that when the bank of England interest rate is 0.5%. Its actually criminal.
Lionel
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Lionel
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Jeanmark, I completely agree with your last point.

There is an Old Testament point about being very willing to help those who will be helped, but turn away from those who would squander your offer. If that applied 3,000 years ago how much more so now?

But I say again, let's not judge an entire generation on what we see from the more visible ones. Let's be of a generous spirit but tight with our money.

The two step grand children who come here have been under a regime this last few years. Work and I'll be generous. If you don't work you won't even eat here. It's surprising what results come about when withholding a good meal!
jeanmark
11th May 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Lionel, I am not judging a whole generation, my point was more to do with judging our generation. I totally understand why todays youngsters feel they are on a road to no where, but isn't that how we all felt? Few of us had the expectation of leaving school, getting a well paid job immediately and that would enable us to start on the property ladder. Our expectations were possibly more realistic as we had witnessed previous generations working hard to get what they wanted when they were able to afford it.

Most of us recognised that we couldn't have what we wanted when we wanted it, we had to wait and make do. Maybe that is the lesson we should be giving to the younger generation!
Wilf
12th May 2018
-1
Thanks for voting!
I see that a few people have put minuses against your comment but as I said before I agree and of course we all should as I bet the majority of folk on Silversurfers have kids and grandkids and I am sure all of us would do all we can to help them-makes total sense!
Shroppie
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Young people today have higher expectancy levels of housing, gadgets, holidays etc. Growing up in the post war austerity we had to manage on very little. House prices have rocketed since you could combine incomes to get a mortgage. You could only borrow three times the salary of the major bread winner, which also meant mums could stay at home when baby arrived..
haf
9th May 2018
12
Thanks for voting!
When we first got married we had to save for a deposit on our house, paid high interest rates on mortgages, gradually by being very careful, only camping holidays, only meals out for each Birthday and anniversary, buying food as cheaply as possible did we get into the position that we are in now. We didn't have anything until we could afford it.
I would love it if someone gave me £10000 now.
MrsPat
9th May 2018
13
Thanks for voting!
I wish sombody had given me £10,000 at 25 or even now. We have had to work for every penny and are still working even though we are past 60 and keeping an eye on the budgets.
ChristineJ74
9th May 2018
14
Thanks for voting!
It makes me very angry when pensioners are considered “wealthy “ and young people so hard done by. I started working (p/t) when I was 15 and have worked hard all my life, saved and gone without many things in order to raise my family and have something to leave them ! We started married life in a furnished bedsit sharing a bathroom and toilet with 3 other families. We skimped and scraped to save a deposit for our first house. Perhaps if young people today were not insistent on having everything at once and being able to go out eating and socialising several times a week, they too could save. House prices and wages / cost of living are relative to our day !
Lionel
9th May 2018
14
Thanks for voting!
I think it's unwise to measure an entire generation by the example of just the more visible ones. There's good and bad in every generation. Admittedly, the more visible ones today are the least prosperous and more 'snowflake' people.

I have two 'snowflakes' or as I now call them, 'melts,' because they wither at the thought of any work or inconvenience to them. Grand daughter has quit college after a year. 'It's too hard.' Mmmm. She doesn't know it yet but her financial support lines are about to be cut. No phone, internet, laptop and no more mum's taxi. Her pocket money stops as well. Give her £10,000 when she's 25 and next day she'll have spent it. Grandson is the same.

But, I must say, I know others of a similar age who have their noses to the grind stone with a career in sight.

I'm not at all sure the 'melts' attitudes are all their fault. They are just finding out the State lied to them about education and careers. Parents and grand parents have plied them with all manner of goodies and they believe life is just a conveyor belt of freebies. So we are to blame in a way.

But give them £10,000? No, absolutely not. If that money were available it should go to the women who must work years longer than they were promised.
BobA1
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
They need the same work ethic that we were taught, in our time families were poor and if you wanted to buy a house or improve your finances you found work applied yourself to improve and be able to afford things you desired.
lcoulby
9th May 2018
8
Thanks for voting!
Instead of giving hangouts, how about housing deposits being brought down to an affordable level?
Old but nice
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
Why should I give my hard earned money to some 25 year old I don’t even know. What these people forget is our houses my be worth more now but when we bought them our wages were very low and we struggled then as they struggle now. So don’t blame the elderly for having the foresight to save maybe if the young didn’t spend so much on designer clothes and drugs and booze they would be able to save
archiebold
9th May 2018
10
Thanks for voting!
I was born in 1956. We got engaged at 17 and saved really hard for the next 3 years and bought a house and got married at 20. We didn't have a mobile, a car, holidays abroad, expensive meals out or rent a house. We stayed with our parents and managed to save enough for a 30% deposit. If more youngsters did the same they too would be able to buy a property. Unfortunately they
appear to want it all and are not willing to go without.
Basiunja
9th May 2018
11
Thanks for voting!
We had to work so hard for everything and forgo many things in order to get on the property ladder. A landline and holidays were luxury items, we didn't eat out at restaurants or buy designer coffees every day. The value of our pensions is pitiful and not likely to cover our living expenses before long. Nobody gives us something for nothing, never did, never will.
ValerieM15
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
They would not appreciate
Today's society is to have a good time
Use once then throw away
Most don't know how to
Manage
It money or cook a meal from scratch
Then there
Is always
The bank of
MUM AND DAD
Dave VX
9th May 2018
11
Thanks for voting!
Born 1944. We had very little compared to nowadays and we had to work very long hours for low wages. Kids nowadays don't know how lucky they are. The spend money on expensive gadgets and mobile phones. Many have have cars (we were lucky to know anybody who could afford a car. We contributed to our pension for our entire working life and the pension we get is one of the lowest in in Europe. Very few people had their own houses and renting was the norm. Youngsters nowadays think that money grows on trees and they should be made aware that they are not entitled to everything that they want just because some people are better off than they are.
J of Kirton
9th May 2018
7
Thanks for voting!
£10k -- it wouldn't be appreciated as the majority believe the world owes them a living anyway. This has all come from the so called easy money of credit cards where if something is wanted, rather than needed, it goes on the 'card' and debt begins to mount up. The days of saving up before buying seem to be long gone mores the pity, at least things were looked after then if you'd paid hard earned cash for it.
Really think it is time for us all to slow down, and think of the consequences of our actions. It is all such a mad rush these days.
LynetteW
9th May 2018
11
Thanks for voting!
What is wrong with this generation that feel they are 'owed' everything? My pension etc is something that I have earned - Nobody gave us anything for free - Can they not work ,, the monetary gap is all relative. When I had a mortgage the interest rate was up to 15 % and some friends went even higher - so do me a favour young people - go earn what you can, work hard and then you will eventually be rewarded. ....
ChristineJ74
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
Agree entirely - we nearly lost our forst house when the interest rates soared in the early 70’s !
Lionel
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
Whilst I agree with much that's been written below, none the less, this matter is becoming such a decisive issue when it's stated object was to 'repair the social contract.'

I didn't know we had a Social Contract between generations and much less that it needed repair.

It was propounded by David Willetts Executive Chair of the Resolution Foundation which has formed the Intergenerational Commission. Willets is a Commissioner. These are, in short, Quangos.

I don't recall reading anywhere Millenials have demanded £10,000 as a tax free gift from tax payers. Nor can I recall Boomers insisting their children should have such a gift.

No, this furore has arisen because the Intergenerational Commission jumped in with both feet and stoked up an already tense situation between the generations. And that from some highly paid 'officials' whose job is to repair damage! Does it get any better?

It's worth noting, David Willets championed the privatisation of the NHS; was one of the architects of PFI, that leasing scheme introduced by Labour which is bankrupting the NHS, raised student tuition fees from £3,000 annum to £9,000 in one hop and several other public political suicide moments.

So the generational repair scheme is in good hands, then, just like the NHS.
Moleman
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
If you could guarantee the £10k went towards a house, then yes, if they showed commitment and contributed the majority of the mortgage. But definitely no, if not, it'd just be squandered.
CatherineC25
9th May 2018
8
Thanks for voting!
Pensions for women first !
CatherineC25
9th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
Pension for women who are in poverty first !
scandiman
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
Take my nephews as an example. How would nephew A feel about nephew B, aged 25 getting £10k, which he won’t get because he is 30? When a young adult, just like many others on here, I had to make my own way. Life isn’t fair, deal with it. Our problems have occurred because 1. none of our clever, highly paid decision makers recognised that the boom generation are now getting old and will need care, 2. every government has failed to deal with lack of affordable housing, for various reasons and 3. SOME millennials have
a sense of grievance and entitlement SOME are very immature, they have adult bodies but a child’s mind. They really need to grow up. So no, they don’t get £10k.
ValentineL
9th May 2018
3
Thanks for voting!
I worked until I was 72 as I had my state pension as well it was all taxed together as income so more avordable houses are needed NOW to sort out the homeless and people on low incomes and no I will not pay taxes instead of sending so much money to places like india which has many wealthy people they should help their own and the money put in the N H S
Toria Jane
9th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
Echo others comments. Had no car, no new furniture or holidays. Worked very hard. Own house now but paid high interest rates on a mortgage for many years. We weathered the 3 day week during the seventees. Each generation faces a different challenge. Why do the politicians pick up on the media's attempt to divide the generations? A lot of parents & Grandparents are already helping children & grandchildren and "rich" they are not!
HappyHippie
9th May 2018
6
Thanks for voting!
we had to work really hard to buy our first house, we both had two jobs, my son and daughter-in-law also have to work hard to afford a mortgage and look after their family but we did it.. So now its time for the younger ones to do the same, and if working 2 jobs is too much effort then sorry they will have to rent
Bald123
9th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
Nobody deserves money for doing nothing-unless you win the football pools or lottery and even then you have to pay to be in them. Youngsters are inding it much more difficult to buy property. Some of this is the governments fault they need to build skyscrapers and a lot of them in major cities which would give wokr to builders and a lot of other industries and provide the proiperty needed to get the prices down. Simples..... the Chinese have managed to get 600 million peole into cities in the past 20 years-surely we can get a few million of our younger folk on the property ladder?
AvrilF9
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Yes, if the young folk will not consider it below them to go fruit and vegetable picking, fill supermarket shelves, etc etc. My generationdid this no help from mum and dad, but a giid firm work ethic.
JanetT7
9th May 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
No one helped us , we helped ourselves. We did without and worked hard to get what we wanted so why can’t they
MandyD7
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Absolutely ludicrous idea!
Let's not tackle the issues of exhorbitant house prices/right to buy/social housing shortages.
Let's just throw money at the problem - money this country could put to better use, like the NHS, repairing the nations roads, funding Admital nurses, increasing fundings for mental health care - just a few examples.

All that will happen is that sellers will increase the price of their houses by up to 10%.
shielward
9th May 2018
15
Thanks for voting!
reality check needed here, if the young start cooking from scratch, doing without phones, computers, coffees on the go. Foreign holidays, cars and all the other luxuries we could not afford at their age. They will be able to save a deposit for a house, we were not given anything on a plate, also a large percentage of baby boomers (so called) had to give our parents all our wages when we started work at 15 to help support the family and we were then given pocket money from our parents! I worked from 15 to 64 far longer than most of the millenials will have to work and for less pay (no equal pay and wage top up or childcare paid by the government then). I think the younger generation have far more disposable income than I ever had and am ever likely to have in the future. Stop winging and do what we did - save.
AvrilF9
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Yes yes and yes. so right.
Yodama
9th May 2018
7
Thanks for voting!
Taxing rich pensioners? Just how much do you have to have to be considered rich?
Resentment for pensioners??
It is fuelled by the constant negative reporting in programmes in and on the media. Programming the youngsters minds so that they think we all have a cushy lives that was handed to us on a plate.

We are shown to be the cause of problems with driving, road accidents, NHS and seem to be stealing the very air that they breathe.
Most pensioners have sacrificed everything to be able to buy that first home.

Not a bad idea to re-distribute wealth and pry some money out of the tightly clasped hands of the 1% mega rich .

Pie-in- the-sky to think this will happen, the rich are rich because they don't like parting with their money.

Are there going to be strict controls in place on the money given to the youth? Blowing it on a motorbike or new car will defeat the object.

How about making it easier for the youngsters to get jobs and help them onto the housing ladder?
Build more affordable houses!
I think our government is lazy or lost in a sea of chaos for even thinking this is a good idea.
PhilippaJ8
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
The reasoning behind this is that young people can't afford to get on the housing ladder; so, rather than just give the cash to be used as they please, why not make it £10000 towards the deposit on their first house?
Arshie
9th May 2018
11
Thanks for voting!
When we got married our first home was rented...giving us time to save for a deposit. It was almost totally furnished with second hand stuff or things we had been given as wedding presents. We only went out once a week, to the local pub, and wouldn't have dreamed of going out for a meal or on holiday...we simply couldn't afford it. Neither of us went to uni when we left school (hubby at 15, me at 16) our families needed the income from our wages, and we both worked full time putting every penny we could aside for our deposit. These days people seem to expect everything handed to them on a plate, without putting in the effort. Expectations are far too high now. Reality check needed!!
TerryH58
9th May 2018
5
Thanks for voting!
Most of us who can are already helping both our children and grandchildren.
Taxing pensioners who are probably forced to work due to lack of finances is bang out of order!
Lionel
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
So well said. We're in that place so I understand.
BarbaraG1
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
If they can give 25 year olds £10k the government can give 60 year old woman the money they have lost through sneakily changing the pension age!
Wilf
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
I do agree with that my wife has lost out
KateT1
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
As a nation we need to stop being so hung up on owning property. That money could and should be used so much more usefully a d wisely. While our old folk are in such huge need, while we have homeless, while we have people dying for want of expensive, lifesaving drugs, while our health service is in crisis to mention but a few, let common sense prevail.
And if this is fair, what about the pension age increase debacle which has seen so many women sold short on their retirement?
Millennials in the main are healthy, energetic and able to work hard. Over 60s are much less so.
Valerieking
9th May 2018
12
Thanks for voting!
When we got married we had to save for a deposit doing without many luxuries e.g. A car, nights out - we also had many second hand items of furniture to furnish our home until we could afford to buy new, it was a struggle but we did it and it makes you appreciate what you have now. Nobody seems to want to put any effort into any thing these days and they seem to feel that we should just roll over and die so they can have everything they want without any effort
JLEW1
9th May 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
Money for nothing - certainly not. Money must be earned by working as was the case for the older generation.
kentrix39
9th May 2018
10
Thanks for voting!
Certainly not I worked from age 15 yrs old till 72 yrs. I enjoyed every minute of it because in all the things I did, I did because I liked doing them.
As with all my family,relations and friends we saved going out to eat was a treat not like today where the restaurants are packed,even midweek with people under the age of forty.
Travel also has become one of the must haves no thought to the fact that the £1000 spent could be saved in part for essentials.
Time to do all that when all has been settled in the personal finance department.
Stop moaning about us that worked and saved for what we have. Do not encourage these greedy, I am owed people by giving them a handout that in the main will be spent on nonessentials.
Wilf
9th May 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
To be fair it is a lot more difficult for the youngsters to buy a house than for us as the prices are a larger multiple of wages..I think in London 15 times average wage which is crazy. My kids are in there 20s and they cannot hope to buy a home at the moment even with partners as well. My worry about £10k just given to people is would they spend it all on a home or on a fab holiday. If I was 25 again (I wish!) I know what I would do....get the nearest website featuring Australia!

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