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Has fatherhood changed in the last 50 years?

The traditional image of fatherhood is one that’s associated with the man of the household being the working breadwinner and disciplinarian.

But as society has evolved, so too has the role of fathers – as more women work rather than stay at home for example, families are coming up with new arrangements when it comes to parenting.

Fathers are more active and vocally involved in the care and development of their children than ever before, and far from being a distant figure in their child’s lives, in many families children are close with both parents through every stage of life.

Has the role of fathers changed in the last 50 years? Do you see a difference between how you were raised, how you raised your own children, and how your children are now beginning to raise theirs?

Is it a case that fatherhood has changed or simply how we think about fatherhood has shifted? Share your views in the comments below.

Has fatherhood changed in the last 50 years?

86 people have already voted, what's your opinion? Yes No

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Onecott
15th Aug 2018
0
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I think it’s a good thing that fathers are more hands on.
However I don’t think it’s as good for the children in early years if neither parent( or allocated career) is at home for long periods of the day
Malcmister
23rd Jun 2018
2
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I’m not a father but it seems anyone can be the father of a child but to be a real father takes commitment
Delboy
22nd Jun 2018
3
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I don't know where you live, but I've witnessed a general decline over the years in what we used to call morality. Parents are no longer expected to be married, the term bastard has taken on a completely different meaning. Various 'lifestyles' which we had always seen as perversions are now totally acceptable and what's worse is that this acceptance has now been written into law to such a politically correct degree that any criticism of said lifestyles is likely to find you in a cell. I am grateful that I experienced (endured?) the years before the world went mad (evolved? matured?became more tolerant?) when I and anyone who wished could express their dislike of certain practices openly. I feel sorry for the children of the world who have no knowledge of this freedom, having been conditioned by the various campaigning minority groups that collectively control their thought processes. Tolerance and acceptance have evolved into a form of tyranny which is nowadays self fuelled. Fatherhood is I'm sure a word which like many others will no doubt be outlawed as sexist very soon. Gender specific words like this are already being replaced and Fatherhood will not last long. M6 father was a man, my mother was a woman they produced children naturally and brought us up to do the same. My father had a feminine side and my mother was the authority figure.They made joint decisions as I remember and argued often, but we were a family like millions of others. Nowadays kids are privy to so much more than we were and conditioned to accept that many things we thought of as totally unnatural are perfectly ok. God bless them .
Carol Barrow
16th Jun 2018
0
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In the 1960 s husbands were not allowed to attend the birth of their baby. But by the 70 s could if they wanted to. When my Grandchildren were born in the 1990 s and 2000 s both their parents were at the births . Also the father's take a more active role in bringing up the children .helping with feeding , making up bottles of milk , bathing dressing, and even changing nappies, which is much easier now Terry towel nappies have been replaced with disposable nappies. But lots of Mums return to work after the baby is born, than back in the 50 s & 60 s.
JulieC6
15th Jun 2018
1
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Of course the role of Fathers has changed. Our whole world has changed so radically in the past 50 years. Men are just as capable of running a home and raising children as women are. Children nowadays (on the whole) are raised with equal love from their parents. Fathers are no longer held up as a punishment. There used to be that threat of "Wait till your father comes home" when I was younger. I hasten to add at this point that it was the thought of my dad being upset that I had done something wrong that put fear into me. Gone are the days that the household can cope on one income alone and the lack of things like apprentiships where people were paid a pittance to earn a skill for 3 or 4 years and then finally gained the expertise to earn a substantial raise for their hard work.
HappyHippie
15th Jun 2018
0
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my dad, and my husband were not really hands on dads, never changed nappies or got up in the night, my son however has been hands on with both his children, nappy changes, baths, looking after a sick child, he does his share, with both parents working now I think the man should step up.
Alicia
15th Jun 2018
2
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It has changed as many couples do not marry but have several partners. "Family life" is entirely different today !
Vilafiz
15th Jun 2018
2
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The role of the father has changed, for the better, from the patriarchal figurehead to a much more approachable and integral member of the family. Fathers are far more involved in the day-to-day details of bringing up their children and the onus has shifted from being the “breadwinner” to being in partnership with their spouse. This not only benefits the children but the family unit as a whole. Obviously this a generalisation and does not fit all circumstances.
Salky
14th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
As a man in my 70’s I can definitely say fatherhood has changed since I was young.
Obviously there was no digital or online technology in those days, which nowadays does tend to either bond father and children or cause a real split between them, depending on how daddies can cope with modern day devices.
In a better way though, bringing up families in this day and age is a kinder, more loving life.
There are far more opportunities to keep kids happy, such as television, theme parks and holidays abroad, which just didn’t exist back in the 50’s.
The law also prevents over-the-hill punishment now. Back when I was a child, my father ( who had a very stressful job ) used to take a bad day out on me. He thrashed the daylights out of me at the slightest excuse, causing me eventually to have a breakdown at 11 years of age, and years of mental anguish, which caused me problems bringing up my children. If he’d done that nowadays, he would have ended up in prison.
Yes, you hear about cruelty even now, but the vast majority of families are close and loving.
Let’s hope fatherhood stays positive and continues to be a partnership with their children rather than a controlling dictatorship as it used to be.
jeanmark
13th Jun 2018
1
Thanks for voting!
I believe that at last it is recognised that fathers can raise a child as well as mothers and many do and successfully.

Hopefully, the days are gone when it is believed only a woman can care for a child, men are just as capable and many are willing to share the 'burden'.

30 years ago my brother-in-law came home from work to find his 6, 7 and 9 year old children sat on the sofa alone. Their mother, his wife, had decided she need a new life and left them all. Over night he became father and mother, worked full time, paid off all the debt his wife had run up and successfully brought up three well adjusted children alone. Not once did I hear him complain. I am proud to be his sister-in-law.
Lionel
12th Jun 2018
2
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Yes, the entire job pf parenting has changed so much in our life time.

In my day, dare I say our day, parents were not scared of their kids reporting them, falsely or otherwise, to the authorities. Parents had the upper hand, had the authority necessary to raise civilised human beings to succeed them in the generations.

What a pity so many of our children's generation have let go what we taught them and gone for the oh so modern model.

As a step parent to two and step grand parent to four it seems to me family time doesn't exist anymore. Subscriptions to things like Netflix, Sky, Amazon, Apple TV etc., are now more important. Well, using, or just watching, their devices keeps them away from the parents. Our grand children are far more influenced by Facebook than by either their mother or us!

Family is now a misnomer. It seems to me family is a loose association of beings with little or no responsibilities toward one another, just the younger ones knowing law says they are cosseted.

Fatherhood? It's easy come easy go in many ways. How many single parent families does the State support? However much I disliked my father, and I did, his is a firm authoritarian role model. I knew he was the backstop, and not one to be crossed. It served me well over the years.

If we cast our minds back none of these developments is for the better; not for us, the parents or for the kids. Contrast our childhood with our grand children. We came through adversity, worked hard and made it through. Our grand kids ... I'll leave that one to you.
JulieC6
15th Jun 2018
0
Thanks for voting!
Are you not tarring everyone with the same brush there Lionel?


I love the fact that my grandchildren know how to use the internet to learn all matter of things. Our 8 year old granddaughter has totally awed us with her knowledge of space, nature, science etc. She knows how to check facts out. Yes she loves watching things that I can't see the point of, but I'm sure our parents thought that we wasted our time playing certain games.

She also loves spending time outside playing with friends and going on walks or riding her bike.


You state you disliked your father and knew not to cross him ... I personally don't see that as a sign of respect. It comes across as fear. Children need to be shown love
MrsPat
12th Jun 2018
0
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My dad was perfect. Just enough strictness and always so kind. We had a wonderful childhood. Dads nowdays have to work hard to make ends meet and lots of distractions and travel to and from work. Its a different world
Wilf
12th Jun 2018
3
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Much less strict than it used to be. In the old days if you got out of line your father dealt with it-well mine did with a wooden spoon or the slipper. We tended to behave! Nowdays its not politically correct so kids are not so sure of boundries. Also familes tended to have a lot less divorces so less absent fathers.
[deleted]
13th Jun 2018
0
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Wilf
13th Jun 2018
0
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My mum was once trying to get one of my brothers to do somthing and she broke a milk bottle over his head!
[deleted]
12th Jun 2018
2
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Wilf
12th Jun 2018
2
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I agree-think the Martians put tons of it on me and my brothers we were a nightmare for my poor old dad. We then grew up to moan about the "younger generations"...just like they will do in 30 years time. "The circle of life!"
Margaret Hart
12th Jun 2018
2
Thanks for voting!
Fatherhood has changed enormously for most in the last 50 years although I must say my father was a very forward looking father who believed women should have the same education and chances as males andhe encouraged us in all ways to be well rounded people with our own opinions. However this was not what I generally saw in other families. Many men still thought children should be seen and not heard andwe could be playing really happily and the father came in and everything had to stop andwe had to go,outside. Many did not believe in woman working as once they married they were there to look after them, the house and any children they may have. There was no such thing as fathers getting maternity leave and I believe that once the baby. Is born and the mother pulled together the parntsbshoulld choose who is going to have maternity leave asfirmms cannot afford to keep positions open for long periods. If the man is going to be a house father then that is fair enough as the woman will go back to work. Men always ruled the money and of course kept what ever was left to spend as he wished may it be on drink or if he cared to take proper care of his family ieclothes and holidays if they had any. Dinner would usually be on the table for father coming in and most families ate together unless the father preferred the children fed earlier so he could eat either alone or with his wife. Children did not ask for what they wanted for Christmas or birthdays as there was not usually that kind of money although things had started to charge as it was 1968 and the war had been over for 20 years which wS when people were really poor. 22 years ago I became a mother and a.though to some extent I followed my parents example things had change enormously in that 20 years.
kentrix39
12th Jun 2018
4
Thanks for voting!
Fathers seem to have abanded anything to do with kids after a midteens stage in their lives. Probably something to do with all the PC crud that blights present day life, not for the good unfortunately.
Fathers I feel are afraid to "take charge" of their offspring for fear of offending some passing busybody with nothing but malice in them who will go shrieking to a newspaper or a police man.
With freedom of speech gone and with the PC brigade on the rampage not a nice time in our country.

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