Lest we Forget, by Babs Nicol

image
The following two tabs change content below.
Hello ... I am the Creative Director and Website Editor for Silversurfers and manage all the social media too. I hope you find the features and articles we have shared with you of interest and relevance. Please feel free to comment below and share your thoughts with us ... I hope you enjoy Silversurfers and all that we offer ...

Not a member?

Join the silversurfers community today! It's free, easy to do, and is packed full of features and amazing offers!

Join the community!
Click here if you have forgotten your password
jeanmark
12th Nov 2016
0
Thanks for voting!
Thank you Little Minx for remembering the women as well. I recently had the privilege of meeting Mollie Rose, one of the small number of women who flew spitfires and other war planes to various airfields around the country during WW2. She was present at a talk we had entitled "Grandma Flew Spitfires" and it was made even more interesting to be able to speak to a lady who had done this. Sadly she died a few weeks later but what an honour to meet and talk to her.
LittleMinx
12th Nov 2016
2
Thanks for voting!
I would like to remember the women too who gave their lives for their country. The women pilots who had a huge role in the war, the women who kept the home fires burning so that their dearest could go and fight, the women in the factories, truck drivers, they took up the roles of the men in their absence.

The women spies who served in the most dangerous places to gather information for the war effort.

Violette Szabo, was a Paris born British Citizen, her father was Charles Bushell.
From switchboard operator to a post with the 481st Heavy (Mixed) Anti-Aircraft Battery, she waded into the war effort.
She married a French Foreign Legion officer, Etienne Szabo who was later killed in the war.
Because of her ability to speak French, she was trained as a spy and was parachuted into action. Her husband wrote her a poem when they were in love, it was this poem that she later used as a code between headquarters and herself.
She was captured by the Germans and after being tortured, was sent to a concentration camp and shot.
Her daughter later received a posthumous George Cross for her mother. I know the poem off by heart, it is beautiful.

The life that I have
Is all that I have
And the life that I have, is yours

The love that I have
Of the life that I have
Is yours and yours and yours

A sleep I shall have
A rest I shall have
Yet death will be but a pause

For the peace of my years
In the long green grass
Will be yours and yours and yours.

To all the souls who are buried in the long green grass, and to those who are still living among us.
My greatest thanks for giving up everything for our freedom.
XXXXXXXX
Wilf
12th Nov 2016
0
Thanks for voting!
Violette Szabo was beautiful and brave beyond words. Last year in November there was a poster on the London Underground about her and it bought a tear to my eye. Thank goodness we have people like Violette who defeated the evil
Lionel
11th Nov 2016
1
Thanks for voting!
I'm always deeply saddened, mournful, on this day. Not for myself, but for others, long gone and that before their time.

Twice in twenty years families across this nation were rent asunder by a war with Germany. Fathers, who had fought in World War One watched their sons go to another War in Europe giving lie to the myth they had fought in a War to end all Wars.

So many sons did not return.

War between nations is a most terrible thing, for most of us it beggars the imagination as to what these men endured.

The Head of Science at my school was a very hard man indeed. He was very hard with us youngsters. He intended to make men of us, men of whom he would be proud.

After six years at that school, on our last day, we few gathered around his desk, sitting on bar stools around his elevated desk. "Is there anything you would care to ask me before you inadequates launch yourself into the world?' He had a booming voice.

'Sir, I've heard you entered Belsen after the War.'

Although then sixty years old he was a big muscular man, a military man. Yet he put his face in his hands and cried before us. 'It would have to be you who would ask that.' It was me who posed the question.

Our Head of Science, an NCO, was behind his Officer when they liberated Belson. I cannot imagine that experience for him. But in the end it broke him.

His last words to us school boys were, 'Churchill said, Jaw-Jaw is better than war-war. Let that be your abiding motto.'

If I have a motto in life, that is it.
LittleMinx
12th Nov 2016
1
Thanks for voting!
How very sad Lionel,so many terrible memories. My Uncle john was captured by the Japanese and incarcerated for some time, they cut off his eyelids.
When he came home, at the train station he bowed Japanese style to all his crying relatives. He couldn't cope and became an alcoholic and died too soon before his time, unable to forget. We must never forget.
Feeling weepy now!

Community Terms & Conditions

Content standards

These content standards apply to any and all material which you contribute to our site (contributions), and to any interactive services associated with it.

You must comply with the spirit of the following standards as well as the letter. The standards apply to each part of any contribution as well as to its whole.

Contributions must:

be accurate (where they state facts); be genuinely held (where they state opinions); and comply with applicable law in the UK and in any country from which they are posted.

Contributions must not:

contain any material which is defamatory of any person; or contain any material which is obscene, offensive, hateful or inflammatory; or promote sexually explicit material; or promote violence; promote discrimination based on race, sex, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age; or infringe any copyright, database right or trade mark of any other person; or be likely to deceive any person; or be made in breach of any legal duty owed to a third party, such as a contractual duty or a duty of confidence; or promote any illegal activity; or be threatening, abuse or invade another’s privacy, or cause annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety; or be likely to harass, upset, embarrass, alarm or annoy any other person; or be used to impersonate any person, or to misrepresent your identity or affiliation with any person; or give the impression that they emanate from us, if this is not the case; or advocate, promote or assist any unlawful act such as (by way of example only) copyright infringement or computer misuse.

Nurturing a safe environment

Our Silversurfers community is designed to foster friendships, based on trust, honesty, integrity and loyalty and is underpinned by these values.

We don't tolerate swearing, and reserve the right to remove any posts which we feel may offend others... let's keep it friendly!