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What decade would you choose to be a teenager in?

The excitement of our teenage years often stays with us long into adulthood.

While times and individual stories change, there are things all teenagers have in common: carefree days spent with friends, first loves, first jobs, and hopeful anticipation of the future remain the same whether you were a teenager in the 1960s or are a teen today.

Teenagers growing up today enjoy more freedom and autonomy than many teens who came before them – they have the benefit of the internet and mobile phones to stay connected and share information.

But with that comes pressure, too. Many teenagers suffer from the stress and anxiety of social media and high expectations over achievements, meaning these carefree days aren’t so carefree after all.

Each decade comes with its own benefits and challenges. So today we’re asking you – if you could go back and do it all again, which decade would you choose to be a teenager in? 

 

What decade would you choose to be a teenager in?

1930s
0%
1940s
0%
1950s
0%
1960s
0%
1970s
0%
1980s
0%
1990s
0%
2000s
0%
2010s
0%
Based on 150 public votes.

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BryanS8
3 hours ago
0
Thanks for voting!
I think the question was..... what decade would like to have my teenage years in.... Having read some of your comments I'll stick with the sixties although back then we were living with the fear of nuclear war and the Vietnam War and as a working class teen we were always short of money...still the music was great we could wear what we liked and the days seemed sunny and endless I loved it!!!
diwson
8 hours ago
0
Thanks for voting!
I just loved the 60's, a really magical time, with great music and a sense of freedom. I met my future husband in 1967 to the song 'Whiter Shade of Pale' and this is now our song. Cars were unreliable, crime was almost unknown, doors were left open and people were friendly. I wish people still had those values today.
Lionel
3 days ago
2
Thanks for voting!
The mid 60's.

I lived a stones throw from Kings Road Chelsea at the time. On Saturday morning we could walk into any of the British pop stars just ambling along - no press, no security. Dave Clark Five, Hollies, The Trogs ... they were all there.

No mobile phones to drive me mad, no computers, just real people meeting real people and no settling for a cypher-person on Face Book.

Kinky Boots, mini skirts and wild hair. The Kings Road was a young lad's paradise on Saturday morning.

Then, we could do paper rounds and make some money for a date; my first date cost me 7/6d. 2 x 2/6d for back row stalls seats and the rest on two ice-cream tubs at the interval. Missed the film entirely one Saturday. Finally got to see it 30 years later. It was worth the wait!

These days I see the angst in my step grand daughter when she doesn't get many Face Book likes; her irritation when the current beau doesn't call her, even during our dinner. She's riddled with anxiety all the time in case her cypher-friends on the net reject her.

It is often said, if one remembers the 60's one wasn't there. Not true! I was there and will never forget the 60's. Best time to grow up in.
linj
6 days ago
2
Thanks for voting!
Voted for 1960s, but Wilf is right, would love to have had today’s technology in my 30s, mobile phones, texts, e mails so much easier to keep in contact with friends.
Wilf
13th Nov 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
2010s...whats not to like? Great food, mobile phones, good transport, the internet, all the music from the 50s onwards, nice Australian and New Zealand wine...yep I should have been born 40 years later than I was!
Lionel
3 days ago
2
Thanks for voting!
I'm not so sure about that Wilf. I had a conversation with my step son a few years ago, before he hit the big salary range. His complaint against us Boomers was that we did it all and that there was little or nothing left for his generation to get a first in.

The space race, first man on the moon, solo circumnavigation of the earth in a yacht, breaking the sound barrier and all the foundational achievements in science and technology which, he claimed, meant his generation were followers not leaders.

You know, he's got a point. It was an exciting time, full of opportunity. There weren't the restrictions on opportunity and activity that came in the 2010's.

When caring for the sick and dying, in the 2000's, one patient was an early middle aged lady who was very high up in Health and Safety. It was her career. She'd been stricken with cancer and, perhaps for the first time ever, she had time to listen and hear others. We often talked about my Norfolk childhood, climbing trees, wandering miles from the village, riding on tractors etc., and other very physical pursuits she was horrified.

She could not enter into how a parent or grand parent could allow me such freedom. It was all so dangerous, I could have got badly hurt.

Yes, all that is true, but those things helped make me the man I am. I have fallen out of trees, got stuck on the church roof for a night, been skinny dipping in the local river and tickled trout and so much more. But the risk is so much better than living in angst because Face Book 'friends' don't 'like' you. I couldn't give a damn about Face Book.
Wilf
3 days ago
1
Thanks for voting!
I am not so sure your step son has got it right Lionel...His and later generations will...go to Mars, find alien life, develop artificial intelligence...Its all coming downstream. The stuff our generation did will seem tame in comparison. Yes I agree regarding H&S its all a nonsense and the nanny state. Mind you that's Blighty in 2017...Winston would never have let it happen!.
Lionel
2 days ago
2
Thanks for voting!
Wilf, there seems to be a kind of age of enlightenment in each of the last three centuries. Around the turn of the half way mark in a century there has been a surge in technological progression. Agrarian Reform, Industrial Revolution, the social and mechanical changes in the mid 18th century. We got the transistor in the early 50's. Was that the product of war time science? Or was it ... well, a dramatic change in thinking? I don't know.

We are still paddling around in the latter end of 20th century thinking and science. The latest NASA rockets use conventional propellants yet in development are several other kinds of drive. NASA says it may be 30 years before they're viable. That takes us to the half way point. UK agriculture has peaked, indeed is in a downward spiral, with the last centuries thinking and practices. Unless there are dramatic developments, of which I know of none, then food production will drop and famine be looking us in the face.

Finding alien life is an interesting point, Wilf. I need only turn on the tele for a few minutes and know these characters are aliens. Well, alien to my way of life. Only last week I got up, made a pot of coffee and flicked on the TV for the latest news. I found a sad individual dressed as a bear with a rag over one eye purporting to be a newscaster.

Strong stuff when one is fresh out of bed.
Wilf
1 days ago
2
Thanks for voting!
Lionel yes you are right agriculture production is peaking and even the use of GM crops will not help when for example Africa's population is going to increase from 1.2 to 4 billion this century. I have a feeling it will all get worse before it gets better-look at plastic in the oceans for example-madness but we are eating fish with plastic and fibres in them " Dover sole with with a sprinkling of plastic and some fibres on it sir"? ...you couldn't make it up!
Lionel
1 days ago
1
Thanks for voting!
The inside track on agriculture is the UK is now on the downward slope. Thanks to a meddlesome EU policy of a three crop rotation, winter wheat, spring barley and rape, crop yields are diminishing.

I think it was four years ago wheat production in the prairies of East Anglia dipped below 3 tons an acre, a 17% drop in yield in 1 year. The decline has slowed but it is still in decline none the less.

Sadly, this truth does not show up in official stats since farmers elsewhere are using yet more land for cereals.

30 years ago we began going GM crops. A farm I was working on grew Triticale, a genetically modified version of wheat. Yes, the enlarged seed heads yielded more grain, and it had a much higher protein content than conventional wheat. But the downside was, Triticale require 70% more artificial fertiliser for a 30% increase in yield. Too expensive!

I won't say much more than we are facing food famine in the West, and we may be alive to see it. With increasing populations in the developing countries there will be less cereals on the world market. The fact is there'll be less of everything we need to buy to feed our rapidly growing population. Competition from other nations will drive food prices sky high.

The process leading to this state of affairs is well underway. At present it is unstoppable without a complete overhaul of our agriculture and horticulture. Sadly, I don't think any government has the guts to do it, but Brexit is a marvellous opportunity we should seize. But will we?

We'll both know in a few years when we sit down for Sunday lunch and mourn the missing dishes.

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