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What’s the best part of growing older?

There’s many wonderful things about growing older.

And though as a society there’s huge emphasis on youth, when you consider the alternative, ageing isn’t so bad after all.

From claiming your time back and taking control of your own schedule in retirement to watching your family grow up, there’s so much to enjoy after 50.

Today we’re asking you: what’s the best part of growing older? Take our poll and then share your reasons in the comments below!

 

What's the best part of growing older?

Wisdom
0%
A growing family
0%
A better standard of living
0%
Not caring what others think
0%
Retirement
0%
More time to travel
0%
Not worrying as much about things will “turn out.”
0%
New Opportunities
0%
Senior travel card
0%
Other - comment below!
0%
Based on 324 public votes.

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Catesby
20th Oct 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
What a sad outlook on life you have Darkstar ! don't you enjoy the freedom and time to yourself ? You may look older like the rest of us but looks aren't everything try to look for the good in things not the negatives - enjoy life whilst you can.
Darkstar
6th Oct 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
Can't really see any good points about growing older. More aches and pains, you are a lot slower, plus you just look old.
Yodama
23rd Sep 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
Being comfortable in my own skin, waking up when I want, doing what I want, going where I want.
Being spontaneous and impulsive.
Behaving outrageously and blaming it on "pensioners behaving badly ."
Last but not least, spending time with my grandchildren.

Having "All the Time in the World" as the song goes!
BaW
13th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
I wrote a ream of what I truly feel about growing old...summarised as it's c**p... but have now deleted these comments as I do feel blessed with my friends and family. The only good thing about ageing into retirement is free time.
Pamela June
12th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
Being able to do the things you enjoy when you want too, taking time to enjoy life at a slower pace. Working as a nurse for 40 years life was hectic even in my younger days.
Dickens
12th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
Spending more Quality time together. Just the two of us doing just what we want to do.
Lionel
10th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
Come on Wilf, this is one for you!
Wilf
12th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
Good morning Lionel-It has to be wisdom for me. The older I get the more I realise I do not know especially in today's world
Lionel
12th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
Good evening Wilf, it's good to hear from you. My prompt was somewhat tongue in cheek.

Yes, I agree about wisdom. The problem is we have spent so many years acquiring wisdom and now ... no one wants to hear us!

For me the best part of growing older is learning the discipline of doing daily housework. Oh, how enobled, enriched and liberated my Victorian grand mother, and my mother must have felt. Quite at odds with Germaine Greer's view of women.

I've learned to vacuum the house, but only after exploding a geriatric Dyson. Cost me a new machine!

Happily my wife will not let me touch the washing machine after the Dyson incident, such was the bang!

I've revived my cooking skills and can bake bread when necessary. Yet cakes and fancies defeat me. No plans to improve there.

Next week I plan to sweep the chimney - funny how equality between the sexes is such an ephemeral thing, don't you think? And when it comes to a couple of tons of horse muck for the food garden I'm strangely alone. I want a word with Germaine Greer!

In older age I've learned some (females) are more equal than others ...

That should ensure the fan gets sticky on SS!
Wilf
12th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
Lionel you are right no-one wants to hear us. I am like magnolia wallpaper in our household. I speak and nobody listens. Well who wants to listen to some old fool? My kids say "Yes dad that did used to happen back in the stone age (60s/70s) but it doesn't now. Still what do they know at their age-wisdom...phah they could not even spell it! Trouble with the younger generation is they know nufink about nufink...as I like to remind them...that starts a good old argument!
Lionel
12th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
Oh yes, you're quite right Wilf. We know nuffinck. My step grand daughter whom we raised has her eye on a city apartment. I looked on Zoopla and a similar place in the same block sold for £1,500,000. The girl hasn't yet earned a penny, and she tells me I know nothing of her online life. She's sixteen and I'm 66, and I know nothing!

Speaking of arguments, I have a 40 year old step son. He's a computer services manager in London on £150,000 a year. When he was an impecunious youngster I bought him cars, loaned him our cars and fixed them for him. Then he was a nice chap; I might even say we got on well. Now, in his new found wealth in a wired world where he's always on call he despises my wife, his mother, and I. In fact, after a blazing row he started he hasn't contacted us in more than a year. He knows it all.

But he knows nothing!

Ah well, find your own way, but be prepared to pay the price, as we did. That's my answer.

What do you think, Wilf?
Wilf
13th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
Lionel I am still up and replying to your last comment on this part as there seems to be no box to reply? Money taints everything..as people get it they feel superior. As I have got older I have realised its nice to have but means nothing-it truly is the root of all evil...look at how your stepson has changed and is treating you! The young will grow old and they will change just as all of us have. Time is a great changer. As you get nearer your maker you become more humble and aware of the fragility of life. I also think it makes you aware of how amazing this world is.
Lionel
13th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
You are so right, Wilf. The love of money is the root of all evil. I looked on as my father and some of his family drove themselves mad, and alcoholic, in the pursuit of ever more money, all to die young and in dreadful health without ever spending their ill gotten gains. Not for me! I didn't inherit anything and didn't want to.

I've been so privileged to have spent much of my working life on remote farms where man, beast and nature coincide, mostly amicably. Let's say it's a robust way of life, not for the feint hearted. Whether we call it God or Nature, an overarching dominance prevails, ruling the seasons and ordering life.

In those places an awareness of the balance of all things has been so obvious, and how fragile and wondrous is that balance. To be a part of tens of thousands of farm animal births and yet each one remains special. The gift of life.

Collies have been my company all my adult life yet at times I've need to give a terminally sick dog the gift of death. Such a contrast. Death is the perfect counterpoint to life and a necessary part of life.

My own death is daily closer than it was. Daily I measure my steps and myself carefully, not to waste time but also not to try to pack into the remaining time a wearisome excess.

I'm a product of the Earth, have lived close to it and benefitted from it, and before long I shall return to the Earth. It's the cycle of life.

I have no fear of that moment, although I'll admit after an extra half of home-brew I get a little apprehensive!

What is the best part of growing older? Letting go some of life's burdens and being free to think of eternal things then share them with my wife. Being free to prepare myself for that time which must come.

To die is the only right we have. All else is a privilege!
Wilf
13th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
Well said Lionel-"life is just incredible visions between 2 eternities of darkness" as Nabokov wrote. What I have wondered is... which is the longest eternity the one before or after? After a pint of Guinness I sometimes wonder......

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