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Is it ever ok to snoop on your partner’s device?

More than a third of Britons have admitted to snooping on their partner’s devices and social media accounts to find out whether they are guilty of cheating, a study has revealed.

Four in 10 people confessed to spying on their other halve’s phone at least once a week, while one in five men said they waited until their partner was asleep to use their fingerprint to unlock their phone.

The findings come as family lawyers Hodge Jones & Allen report an increase in people citing information uncovered on devices being used as examples of unreasonable behaviour and adultery for divorce.

“Technology means that there are far more ways to snoop now than there were before,” said Dr Martin Graff, a reader of psychology at the University of South Wales and expert in cyber psychology.

“Social media has also created a world where people might be encouraged to search out information on their romantic partners having maybe seen them in some ambiguous situation – tagged in a post, for example – with someone else, motivating them to search for more information.

“Furthermore, it is also quite possible that people see relationships today in a more casual way, possibly because of the hook-up culture created by mobile dating apps.”

The research, based on a survey of 2,000 Britons, found that more than half of those who snooped on their partner discovered something that led them to believe they had cheated, with 45% of them deciding to end the relationship as a result.

However, participants failed to agree on how to define cheating, with almost six in 10 indicating that sexting should be considered as such.

One in nine said that they believe kisses at the end of a text message constituted betrayal, while 6% said that simply liking somebody else’s post on social media was an indication that their partner was being unfaithful.

“In a world where our lives are increasingly lived online, checking a partner’s phone, email or social media without their permission is surprisingly common,” said Denise Knowles, a counsellor at relationship support charity, Relate.

“It’s understandably tempting, but this doesn’t make it okay.

“Take a breath – imagine you uncover something concerning and ask, ‘is this really how I want to find out?’.

“Think about what’s best for the relationship in the longer-term: once your partner knows you’ve been snooping it will only erode trust further.”

What do you think? Is it ever okay to snoop on your partner’s device, or should our phones be completely separate? Have you ever snooped through the device of a loved one? 

 

 

Is it ever okay to snoop on your partner's device?

219 people have already voted, what's your opinion? Yes No

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viking
2 days ago
0
Thanks for voting!
No secrets= no problems with snooping !!
More likely to be snooped upon by a hacker here !!
nsurf1
5 days ago
0
Thanks for voting!
Not something I would be inclined to do but if I had reason to feel suspicious I would. I'm sure there are quite a few people who could have prevented several wasted years if they had found out sooner.
Wilf
8th Apr 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
No no no no no! Its not done anyway we know everything about each other the whole time so no secrets at all.
Unicorn2
5th Apr 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
If you suspect your partner of being unfaithful I feel you should try and find out as much as possible
jeanmark
6th Apr 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
Why not try asking instead of snooping?
jeaniembe
5th Apr 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Not something I could ever envisage myself doing. Anyway if a party is that untrustworthy, time to show them the door.
Jackie Ovington
5th Apr 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
Alicia
5th Apr 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
No, they should not have anything to hide.
marpo2
5th Apr 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
The Green-eyed monster's tentacles reach far and wide. If you see something that you believe to be one thing, that is actually another, all manner of trouble can ensue. Be disciplined and honest - leave her/his devices to their own devices.
VenaB
5th Apr 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Only in very worrying or exceptional circumstances but otherwise NO!
Lionel
4th Apr 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Not a very principled thing to do, is it?

My wife knows she's quite safe from my intruding into her privacy. My knowledge of mobile phones is a minus factor. I have one, somewhere, can switch it on and ... zilch. The battery is so often flat through lack of use, I'm told.

Give me an Apple computer to sort out and I'm right at home.
Yodama
4th Apr 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Not a good thing to do,..degrading!
SueB412
3rd Apr 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Snooping on a partners device is much the same as opening their mail or secretly listening in on a telephone conversation. To me it's a huge invasion of trust

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