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Is going digital isolating elderly people?

Non-digital alternatives for vital services and information need to continue to be made available to help more than five million adults in the UK without regular access to the internet, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) has warned.

Although the number of adults defined as “internet non-users” has been steadily declining since 2011, 5.3 million in the UK have either never used the internet or have not used it in the last three months, according to an ONS survey last year.

Those aged 65 and over have consistently represented the biggest portion of adults not on the internet, making up 79% in total for 2018, while almost a quarter of internet non-users are also disabled (23.3%).

At a time when services are increasingly moving online, such as banking and billing, concerns have been raised about some people being digitally excluded, with missed opportunities for potential earnings and employability benefits, money savings when shopping, as well as the ability to communicate with friends and family.

“The internet undoubtedly brings many benefits, including helping us to make savings and keep in touch with loved ones,” said Caroline Abrahams, Age UK charity director.

“However, no-one should be locked out of services simply because they don’t use it. Those who cannot, or choose not to use digital technology should not be disadvantaged or made to feel like second-class citizens. It’s essential that there are alternatives so that the 4.2 million older people who aren’t online do not miss out.

“Age UK runs programmes to help people in later life gain the skills and confidence to use the internet, such as the One Digital project. We offer easy-to-follow training so that as many of us as possible can ultimately enjoy the advantages of being online.”

What do you think? Should more be done to encourage people online, or is it important to offer alternatives? 

Is going digital isolating elderly people? Have your say at Speakers Corner.

Is going digital isolating elderly people?

1732 people have already voted, what's your opinion? Yes No

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Bikergran666
20th Jun 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
Well I guess there’s always the exception to the rule..... I’m 65 and do almost everything online. I would be totally lost without my two iPads and smartphone. I even have a reserve phone in case I lose one. My mini WiFi even enables me to use my iPad any where I want. I never go anywhere without it. In fact I no longer have a landline.
RuthF4
7th Jun 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
My M-I-L is 90 and totally computer illiterate. She's run up against alot of trouble as she has always worked with cash, and obviously she doesnt receive e mails. Most companies these days work with online payments and e mails. My husband has had to act as go between on more than one occasion. I remember a few years ago she wanted to buy a baby gift but was having trouble getting out ,so I showed her the relevant website and scrolled through and ordered it. She was amazed! We've skyped her grandsons invarious countries. She's missing out on alot
sparklingsilver
4th Jun 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
At 81 advancing digital technology in many forms has been part of my life for many years. As an aid, and as exciting as all advances have been, I am still as cautious about its use as I have ever been and privacy the most valued. There is also a profound issue in an increasingly digital age related to the elderly, many of whom live on limited incomes. Those who do not have the wherewithal of the cost implication of digitalisation usage are left behind.

I do not use a mobile phone other than for emergencies, particularly in public places. Being exposed to others inane chatter is irritating and intrusive, and when out and about with friends the taking of a phone call or sending and receiving messages, is to my mind, the height of old-fashioned discourtesy.
SueC62
24th May 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I suppose I'm elderly being nearly 65 but technology is an integral part of my life - control my heating, keep in touch with friends all over the world, manage my bank accounts etc. My older relatives were never technologically savvy and in any case are now physically dependent on us. I'm more worried about some of the slightly younger generation, in my own family anyway, who don't want anything to do with technology. My younger sister, 54, didn't want to know but I've since given her an old notebook and told her she must embrace technology or she will lose out once she retires. I've even impressed some of the teens and twenties I know with the apps I have that they'd never heard of 🙂
Onecott
22nd May 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
Important to have & to offer alternatives. It’s never a good idea to rely on only one
viking
25th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
Just to-day after switching on "the beast", checking to see that it might behave itself, went and boiled the kettle made cups of tea, still no sign of you know what. Still not making an appearance, so gave up, will try later to-day.
Personaly I don't think even a trip to see Dancerupstairs at the Citizens Advice would help to lassoo some more power from broadband in this area !!
Bey
24th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I find it infuriating that people who either don't have a computer or are not very good with technology lose out when it comes to keeping up with contracts for phones, broadband, utilities etc.
I keep up with my contracts and always get in touch with the companies to renegotiate a new contract, but I know friends who cannot do this for various reasons.
For example my friend is paying a lot more for her phone and broadband contract than she needs to but will not accept help to change it as she is frightened that something will go wrong.
These companies should offer fair deals to everyone.
Yellowmellow
22nd Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I'm lucky enough to be IT literate (mostly forced to be because of working), but many of my clients, especially those over the age of 70 are sacred of technology and can't/won't use it.
Retiredyorkie
21st Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I am a senior citizen and use a computer etc and get on ok but not everyone either has a computer or wants a computer and like me living alone its very nice to have a conversations with another human being.
Dancerupstairs
19th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
It is not only Age UK who run programmes for those who either cannot or do not access the digital world. Citizens Advice where I am have drop in sessions for any computer related problem as well as courses, and I do note that the majority who access these are not elderly, if they are it's often a query of how to achieve something specific rather than having no knowledge or access!. With Universal Credit applications being online it has brought many " younger" people to the realisation that this is the future!
If you think about it, telephones were once considered the devils work!
Funny face
18th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I find it really frustrating that we are forced to communicate via online sites and have to remember unending passwords which when you know you're using the right ones, you're notified as having used the wrong one and have to go through endless processes to get where you need to go.

I work in an office and accept using computers, but don't really want to much after leaving work. I need person to person contact which is more life affirming to me and I can see the person eye to eye.
Wendy1958
18th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I’ve never agreed with leaving the elderly behind, I believe they become Isolated and left out, not being able to just go into the office of there council and pay rent, not everyone wants to shop on line, I’ve never shopped on line and never will, elderly are vulnerable enough without having there accounts hacked, it’s just unfair to leave them behind,
viking
15th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
Well consider yourselves very lucky to do all these wonderful things "on line".
It would be so wonderful if broadband could ever reach the advertised speeds that are advertised so forcefully.
People here are still using the abacus, but there is no point in complaining ...no one is interested if you are over 65.
Yodama
18th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
You have broadband? Well your lucky!!
I live in the countryside, broadband is hit and miss, my mobile phone signal usually shows the "no service" message, I get 1 bar if I am lucky.
I am constantly being told off for not being available and when my phone goes straight to voice mail.
Banking by phone is a no-no, I do get by shopping online but the phone signal won't allow any contact with the rest of humanity.
Phones are taking over now, soon PC's and Laptops will be a thing of the past. All in all, the services are not keeping pace with galloping progress.
Needs thinking through don't you think?
Munsterlander
14th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
Not at all. How can it be? I am in my 70's. I go on lots of blogs like this The Times, the daily Mail. i play chess online. I have tons of emails. I listen to podcasts. I watch Youtube and Ted talks. The internet brings us all together. Best thing ever invested after the wheel.
SusieB100
14th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
There is no doubt that there are great advantages that have come with the digital revolution, indeed we are enjoying one of those benefits right now as we use this site. Like many, I use the internet to communicate with friends and sometimes with family, also for shopping, comparing utility costs and getting my bank statements.
But this revolution does not seem to know where to stop and there is now talk that physical money, i.e. cash, may well be phased out as contactless payments are now so simple.
But cash still has a place and not just amongst the older generation.
For example, if I choose to give a tip to an individual who has given exceptional service then cash is ideal, otherwise are they supposed to carry a personal contactless payment device? The same with the homeless chap who I may choose to give a little money to - if he could afford to carry such a device I would question his need.
And what happens when things go wrong, as has happened on occasion with banks when folk cannot access their accounts or make payments? Those contactless cards are vulnerable too as hackers can easily swipe past you and have the details within seconds.
Technology is not infallible and should be used as an aid to our lives and not be allowed to rule them.
Cassie 181
14th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
Its obvious, but no one cares about old people. If the government could get away with it they would probably exterminate everyone over sixty.
Munsterlander
14th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
I think that is a bit harsh especially as most of them are over 60. It would be like Turkeys voting for Christmas.
Funny face
18th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
Ha ha from a young oldy
ChristinaC5
13th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
Yes it keeps me in instant contact with long-standing friends and family around the world apart from shopping online which is very convenient.
ElisabethR
13th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
Yes it can isolate those who do not use the internet. Not sure about it making banking difficult though. I refuse to bank via the internet and every time there is a blip I feel justified. Whenever i go to the bank there is always a long queue for counter service.
As for other everyday services there is still, usually an alternative. However some people do misunderstand when a service goes digital that there is an alternative. Think more should be done to inform people of these.
Clydesdale
13th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
I am in my 70s and do everything online. I have taken this digital stuff and tried to use it to my advantage. My mother-in-law however, is not so lucky. We received a phone call from her the other day and she was clearly distressed. She is 86 and she had received a letter from her insurance company to renew her house insurance, but instead of giving her a form to sign and post, they said she now had to do it all by phone. Now at 86 trying to work out all those blasted options on a phone to get to the right person is just not going to happen! So my husband had to call on her behalf to pay. This is not right ... everyone should be considered whether it be because of age or disability.
viking
12th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Its all very well for some of the younger oldies to say that it is so useful and increases safety. In our area there are no banks or post office, broadband ??- well don't be in a hurry !
Most of the banks wish us all to bank on line, so they can do away with sending paper statements, and reduce their costs. Utility companies offer incentives to do everything "on line" again to reduce their costs.
I just wish that there was some way we could emulate these companies and save ourselves some money, without wrestling with the so called digital revolution. All of these things are designed to isolate the elderly.
JanetC124
12th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
i would never bank on line i do use a debit card and cash also cheques our town bank is closing in may this year, the elderly will have a 7 mile journey to use a bank , Yes the elderly are increasingly being isolated due to technology
ElisabethR
13th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
Dont forget you can withdraw and pay monies into your bank account via the post office if you are a journey away.
Bey
24th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I use online banking but for those who don't, it's getting harder, as a lot of post offices are closing, which has happened in out town.
MarjorieF8
12th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
Elderly people are increasingly isolated due to technology. The internet is so widely used excluding personal contact which is so important . Closure of social centres, day centres etc., mean that only a few of we old folks have face to face contact with another human being. I am fortunately able to use the internet, but it is no substitute for the company of another person.
Pattipos
12th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
I am computer literate but I still do not wish to bank online and feel angry I do not have a local bank anymore, having to go miles in order to use one. In a day full of hackers and hostile attempts to invade our privacy I fear there will inevitably be a castrophe at some point in the future. Older people still need access to cash to pay for some services such as a gardener, or to pay a neighbour collecting groceries for them ( my mother kept cash in her house for this) and I can only see the problem getting worse.
MargaretM32
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
We have a new kind of senior citizen. I am nearly 70 and spent most of my working life putting stuff on the computer from pay, ammunition to land. Now I am retired I am quite happy to use my tablet for booking holidays and social interaction but I don't want to use it all day everyday like the young ones. I have to go to the library to print things off because paperwork is still needed for trips to the theatre, holidays and boarding tickets. I think it is wrong that the utility services and council tax and social housing expect Everyone to have access to a computer. I have just moved into assisted housing and I was expected to use a computer there was no alternative given but in the complex I have to provide my own broadband it is not a given in the community room.
Bey
24th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
Hi Margaret, does the complex you’re in have an office that will print off your tickets, you could offer to pay for the paper?
Or maybe buy a printer, they are very useful.
ElisabethR
24th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
Akward isn't it when you are uncomfortable with some of ways things operate now? My daughter and son in law have all their flight tickets etc on their mobiles.....no paper! Cant get my head around that. The library are great at helping you with this kind of printing but......Ha ha am off on oliday soon and dont ave any of tat tis time. I am going eith Saga and tey send your tickets. How great ...to have a proper ticket.....just so long as I remember to pick them up on my way out.
MargaretM32
25th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
No the office won't let me I go to the library and pay 10p a sheet. I do prefer to have a hard copy for my tickets to places and I've used a printer at home but the ink dries up and is expensive to replace
ritso
11th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
I am coming up to 76 and use a PC not only for communication but for social contact across the world, for keeping and editing photos, writing letters and keeping records. In my late 50s I studied IT to get work but I continue to keep up with digital technology so that I can keep up with my grandchildren and not hold them back. I am able to converse with them at their level. I hike in the mountains and use a mobile phone, not just for my own safety,but to summon help for others who may be in need of assistance and also so that my position can be found. If you don't know or don't have access to a PC or the like, go to some of the younger people who are only too glad to help and guide - and think of the social interaction that brings.
MargaretM32
25th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
Well done I think that's brilliant. My grandchildren have kept me up to speed even though I've worked with computers since 1967
Helen Highwater
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
It isn't just about using a particular service; for a lot of elderly people, going out to shop or bank or to the Post Office is the only social contact they have. Take that away and yes, I do think there is a danger of isolating the very section of society that really needs personal contact.
Cagsey
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Unfortunately it is a sign of the time and some older people are going to be left behind. Which I find very sad.
DotD9
11th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
As with a lot of things it’s about choice,which shouldn’t be taken away and then forced into using something you’re uncomfortable with.
MargaretB418
11th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
For those of us in rural areas where there is no presence of a bank, life is increasingly difficult , Internet is not always reliable and very few of the elderly around me have the use of a computer any way . Very few of the 80/90year olds are au fait with modern forms of communication ...
If you are in the 70's today around me that is considered "young"!
NatalieR
11th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
digital is NOT isolating elderly people. danger outside their homes is making them more aware of their safety, and digital is making it safer for them to protect themselves. natalie rose
Munsterlander
14th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I agree with you. There are lots of internet devises to make older people feel more secure
debat3gates
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
This is something that does trouble me. My 84 year old mum is not and never will be a "silversurfer" , she tried a few years ago but just couldn't get to grips with it. If it were not for me she would miss out on so many savings as I, with her full permission administer her on-line presence by looking after her utility bills and Car insurance etc. which I switch regularly. I also save her money by purchasing on line when she needs something. In doing so as a conservative estimate I save her around £300 a year. It infuriates me that so many services are unavailable to her because she does not embrace the technology, not just the Internet but she also can't text and don't get me started on call centres that ask you to press numerous numbers before speaking to a real person. There must be so many elderly people who don't have a tech savvy daughter to help them who are quite frankly discriminated against.
Bey
24th Mar 2019
0
Thanks for voting!
I agree, I've just posted the same complaint.
It's not on that people suffer financially because they are not tech savvie.
SusanneJ5
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
I am totally IT Savvy but I can understand those who are interested in taking it up later in life. Closing banks and services impact on all ages and makes life more difficult for some who have mobility issues. The Internet was supposed to help us all but I can see how it can isolate many people. In the future we might not have any reason to go through the front door as our high streets will not have much to offer.
VeronicaJ
11th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
Many elderly people have memory problems. It is very difficult to access the internet if you cannot remember your password. For them a written document that they can hold and read is more acceptable. Besides which Banks etc are supposed to offer a service .customer satisfaction should be considered.
holden_brenda
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
I am 79, and am lucky enough to have family living nearby. They bought me a computer, and taught me how to use it enough to deal with everyday matters. If I have a problem I can turn to them for help.
If I didn't have anyone to help me I would not have known where to start. Choosing a computer and setting it up would have been beyond me, as would dealing with any hiccups with running it, and setting up security.
I have quite a few friends who wouldn't know how to start, and are finding it more and more difficult, in this computer age and 'cashless' society.
LauraA4
11th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
I use smart phone and IPad for on line banking shopping,,games, ,keeping up with family. Youngpeople no longer write letters and without the above I wouldn’t know so much about what children and grand children were up to. . I am 78 and feel sorry for some contemporaries who do not seem interested in learning the above or don’t trust it. Luckily they appear to be in the minority.
IanW8
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
I volunteer with libraries giving support to many people on laptops. Smartphones.,tablets as well as security issues. The vast majority are aged between 50 and 80ish. Most of my job is providing confidence to people who have been frightened to learn or have been shown by someone who rushes through instruction.
LindaH736
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
This time last year I got very frightened on behalf of a lot of strangers who will never know who I am. Their was a bus strike. The timetables as far as I could tell were only available on the internet. I knew that their would be thousands of elderly and disabled that would have no idea if and when the busses were running. It was especially concerning that were I live half the houses are for the elderly and we live at the top of a hill. The doctors and chemist were at the bottom of one side of the hill and half way down another side of the hill. Elderly and disabled needed the busses to get anywhere. We had a corner shop, with no cashpoint. Our hairdressers closed down because a lot of my neighbours had to find somewhere else to live during the strike. I have since been campaigning both on the over reliance on inaproprate tech and trying to get more seats and shelters. Since the strike I have seen some new electronics in the bus shelters letting customers know about current issues. I fully believe it will continue to be developed and will take many years to sort out. I do some things on the internet but I prefer to use cash. Until they can develop a card that tells me exactly what I have spent and how much I have left, I am not interested. I also try when I get the chance to explain to various companies just how hard itbis to keep up with the sites I do use. I understand tech needs to keep evolving but each time they change someting it is like appearing on masternind and the crystal maze at the same time. Their used to be some older person walking by my window every few minutes. It was hiw they socialised taking their dogs for a walk. About 90% of the elderly dog wakers have disappeared, and the pavements are very empty, hour after hour.
houn66
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Smartphones are a great invention as are tablets. Rarely use a laptop now.Mobile banking is simple to use and a godsend with branches closing at a great rate of knots. I am 73 and have embraced technology including attaining a City and Guilds in computer studies. Your never too old to embrace technology
Hazbeck48
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
I was lucky enough to be taught how to use a computer whilst I was still at work. This means that although I am by no means a computer expert, at 71 I am able to use the.internet for banking, emails, etc. but I do feel sorry for people of my age who did not use computers in their workplace, and therefore are not computer-literate. More and more services are now online, and many of the increasing, elderly population are physically less able to get out and about to use high street service (if there are still any left, that is!). There should still be alternative methods available - after all, how could we all cope, in the event of major power cuts, or even a global network virus attack?
Andresia
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
There should be continuing access for all older people to services. Otherwise their rights are being taken away.
JeanC5
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
Although I use the internet frequently I still do not want to use it for online banking as I do not trust the security of this. Many others must feel the same.
Pattipos
12th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
Rubidoo
11th Mar 2019
4
Thanks for voting!
My husband has the most basic of mobile phones and all he uses it for is ringing me, he can’t even use my iPad, he is not interested in any technology’s prefers face to face communication.
Poppyrose
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Companies i.e. banks and marketing companies are not interested in providing a service for everyone and of course 'old' people are not worth a thought - well here's a thought, just because many do not like using computers or smart phones, that does not make them irrelevant and they have money to spend but of course they won't if they cannot access it - Corporate world, get a clue here, you are showing a massive business ignorance!! Customers are customers whether they are 18 or 80, they all need respect and an equal facility and you are not providing either!!!!
AlanN4
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
It certainly hasn't isolated me. On the contrary, it has kept me in touch with old friends who live to far away for us to meet regularly, and helped me make new (digital) friends with common interests.
BeverleyMB
11th Mar 2019
4
Thanks for voting!
Dont feel confident with lnternet banking ...& what happens when or if l`m no longer able to use a computer ? must i depend on someone i trust to do even more for me ?
GeraldineM46
11th Mar 2019
4
Thanks for voting!
My husband has been a manual worker all his life, hence very limited use of technology, and he despairs at the banks and government forcing him to use a mobile phone to get text alerts. He is in his 70's and is finding it very difficult to use modern technology.
JudithB54
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
I find it very concerning, in my area we are shortly going to have to pay for parking electronically and it will be difficult to pay for any Council services in cash.
joan1947
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
Over 70's are not happy with online banking.
Margaret Dempsey
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
I'm fed up with people who try to push things on you like banks wanting you go on line and other companies who want you to go paperless am standing my ground just stop life is hard enough
missfromdiss
11th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
I've thought that for a long time. Even on the news a while ago, they used to say for more information about a news article, log into our website. I used to wonder then about people who don't go online.
Bizylizy
11th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
A
I am 92 and using computer etc. but I attend club for retired and of the 30 members only two use acomputer but most carry a mobile phone (used mostly for emergency calls to relatives.)
Alicia
10th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Yes too many things rely on us using the Internet, some elderly people are unable to do this. They like to communicate with real people !
Yodama
10th Mar 2019
6
Thanks for voting!
Yes I do believe it is a cause for concern. It is not only the aged who do not own computers, people on low incomes and disabled to some extent have difficulties trying to keep up.
My neighbour can't write and although I helped him to try and use the computer, he gave up, it was too much for him. There are many who are in the same boat.
Some of my older neighbours do not drive and as there are only two buses per day, they are lost. I offered to shop for them online only to be told that they wanted to "see and touch" the items they were buying.
They also miss out on discounts on paperless billing etc, tragic and should be looked at.

Are we going too fast in this mad world....yes I think so.
Lionel
10th Mar 2019
4
Thanks for voting!
I've often argued on Surfers against so called progress - my case being so much is rolled out and implemented without sufficient attention to social and economic impacts on generous slices of our population. It's more about corporates and the state not spending money in the long term, as well as more state control.

Sadly, one or two mainstream posters say I'm a Luddite. That is not so. I have, and will continue to plead the case for full economic assessments, long term effects and social impact assessments before new technology or procedures are rolled out. I care little that Europe or Japan are years ahead of us technically but I do care a lot about our society, our people and the quality of our lives - especially our latter years.
Irene88
9th Mar 2019
7
Thanks for voting!
I'm a member of a group called Sheffield50+ and we try to represent the view of the over 50's in Sheffield and inform them of news and information that may affect them or their famillies. We have 2500 members. However approximately only 500 have digital accesss and getting our messages across is increasingly difficult. We had to merge with Age UK to keep pur charity going. But they only send their brochure out quarterly and only to embers who pay £12.00 a year.

Also cuts to bank branches and cash machines is making life more difficult and isolating for many members of our society.

Then of course there is the cost of being digital, equipment, internet access, and ability to use this medium. How many pensioners on a basic pension can afford all this when they struggle to keep themselves fed and warm?
Lionel
9th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
Congratulations on actually doing something about this matter. Many good points. Thank you.
Irene88
13th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Thanks Lionel, I could have written a lot more but didn't want you all to die of boredom!!!
Lionel
13th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Please do write more. Perhaps that will inspire others, you never know.

As for me, I'm a retired farmworker, a working man living in a very rich rural area. No one needs anything around me, or so they think.
PaulyC
8th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
I like to think I have a balanced view of things looking at pros and cons of digital and non-digital. The inference is always that digital is always the “bad boy” in life but when you think about it there are many situations where the reverse applies. One situation is shopping where online shopping allows the goods to be brought to the house but if this was unavailable the person may not be able to get to the shops themselves. The same applies to online banking.
We can’t stop advancing our capabilities if the majority need it. Maybe we need to train care assistants to assist with these functions?
classy
8th Mar 2019
2
Thanks for voting!
Neither My husband or I are are as mobile as we once were so the internet has become vital to us for many reasons including communicating with family and friends, even though they they visit it is nice to be able to have a nice chat whenever you feel like it. Also much of our shopping is done on line
WilliamM36
8th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
As previous comments there needs to be a balance not totally digital but there definitely should be a centre in every town for those who struggle with the digital age
Helga1
8th Mar 2019
6
Thanks for voting!
Some older people cannot retain the new information they are given and become excluded. There should be a means of accomodating people with an alternative.
Riversiderouge
8th Mar 2019
3
Thanks for voting!
I'm approaching my 75th birthday, but I don't feel isolated, because I realised some years ago that those people who did nothing to find their way around a home computer would be severely disadvantaged in the future. I signed up for a beginner's course at the local college, and found that my fears were completely unfounded. YOU NEVER STOP LEARNING!
Raindrop
8th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
Personally I use the internet daily for any information I need and to keep in touch with friends but then I have a son a daughter who encouraged me and showed me how to do this. I now bank on line too which I vowed once I`d never do. My late husband on the other hand hated it and would never use it he preferred to visit a bank and speak to someone face to face. He couldn`t even text bless him. I think every town should have a bank or post office accessible for the elderly to use though, why should this older generation be forgotten.
viking
8th Mar 2019
9
Thanks for voting!
Having spoken to an owner of one of the latest "smart" phones, it seems that an owner needs to be a Bsc these days to just fathom the workings of these latest creations. The main problem seems to be that techknowledge is moving faster than a human can absorb. Every few weeks apparently there is an "update" which moves all icons around and produces different results than previous.
The vital question is how can the older generation just keep up with these advances. To add insult to injury, when enquiring from a phone shop as to how?? To then be told everyone knows how to do this/that etc, that's why an instruction book is NOT available !!!
Margret
8th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
There are lots to be gained by digital but they are for ever trying to make us silver surfers live longer but then put so many things out of there reach.
Not2grey
7th Mar 2019
7
Thanks for voting!
My husband resolutely will not have anything to do with the Internet , he's old school preferring to go into a bank and have face to face conversations with real people .I use the Internet but not for banking I'm itch him on face to face contact . The Internet is a useful tool but nithing can replace real personal social interaction .
viking
6th Mar 2019
7
Thanks for voting!
Well said Lionel. It is really alarming to hear "it's on the internet ".
However those of us that live in rural locations do not have the luxury of broadband and the internet just when we like. In spite of the hand wringing by the government this country is still not fully covered.
I regularly meet seniors who do not want their bank account "hacked" and prefer to try to conduct their business personaly in what is left of the high street banks.
Many of the older generation no longer have good eyesight and find fiddling with the screen impossible.
Wilf
6th Mar 2019
4
Thanks for voting!
I saw an interesting view in the papers a couple of weeks ago Viking that proposed scrapping the HS2 and getting the whole of the UK 5G which is 20 times faster than 4G. makes sense to me.
Lionel
6th Mar 2019
5
Thanks for voting!
Of course digital technology is isolating the elderly, and many more besides. It wasn't designed or rolled out with any thought towards those who for whatever reason have no internet access and perhaps, like me, don't use a mobile phone. The facts are plain to see.

If more thought and discussion had been invested in making this digital revolution more inclusive and far less exclusive Britain would be a better place for it's elderly and disadvantaged.

Bank branches are being closed at a heck of a rate; cash machines are disappearing, in fact cash is disappearing equally as fast but no one in government asked us if that's what we wanted. When we were asked the outcome was clear and yet government has fudged and wormed it's way out of leaving the EU.

Yet another massive failure by our governments and big corporates. It sometimes seems to me we're only considered when they want something as at election time or our money.

Rein in the corporates and remodel the state system with direct voting and a referendum democracy. No ifs, no buts, just do it!
jeanmark
5th Mar 2019
6
Thanks for voting!
It isn't just the elderly, many homeless people do not have access to the internet. Oh, they are told to use their library, but as many are closing, that can be an impossible task. Added to that the problems they encounter from other people when they try visiting a library can make them feel even more excluded from society.
Wilf
5th Mar 2019
1
Thanks for voting!
I think it is helping them. I do not consider myself elderly (even though my kids in their 20s do). The internet has opened up my world and helps in many ways to bring people together. Silversurfers is one example, email, Facebook and being able to get information easily all help a lot. I also play chess online with my kids when they can be bothered to be beaten at it!

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