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Should families be able to overrule your wishes on organ donation?

Share your views for Organ Donation Week

It’s Organ Donation Week in the UK, a campaign that aims to get more people to join the organ donor list.

Despite large campaigns, there is still a shortage of people signing up and putting their names on the NHS donor register.

The NHS has said people are dying needlessly while waiting for a transplant, and if more people talked about it and agreed to donate, many of those lives would be saved.

The simple act of registering can make your wishes known – you can also register that you would not like your organs donated.

Even if your name is on the register, your family can still be a barrier to donating your organs, as they must ultimately give their consent for a transplant to go ahead.

Since April 2010 more than 500 families in the UK have said no to organ donation, despite knowing or being informed their relative was on the NHS Organ Donor Register.

25-year-old Tom Shing was saved by a pioneering heart transplant two years ago, and this year is urging people to join the register.

“The question is, would you be willing to take a donor organ for yourself, your husband, wife, son or daughter?” he said.

“If yes, then you should be willing to sign up and put yourself on the organ donor register.”

Do you think families should be able to overrule your wishes about organ donation if you have joined the registry? What about in instances where you would choose not to donate your organs – should your family be able to donate them anyway?

Should families be able to overrule your decision about organ donation?

173 people have already voted, what's your opinion? Yes No

What are your views?

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Koda
20th Oct 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
My husband and I had this discussion only the other day. We both feel that if anyone has taken the time to think about organ donation and given their consent then their wishes should be followed. We are all responsible for our own lives and bodies so therefore the decision as to whether to donate organs or not is ours and ours alone and families should honour these decisions.
Of course discussions among the family should definitely take place as a normal part of life.
GlynysH
15th Oct 2017
0
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I live in Wales you have to opt out otherwise you are considered a donor. Families should not be able to change the will of the deceased person to become a donor.
mothra
22nd Sep 2017
0
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I'm afraid I fundamentally disagree with Jo- and that you should not be automatically on a donor list. It may just be me, but I then feel that even your own body doesn't belong to you, but eventually the state, to dispose with it as they will.
However, I do believe in organ donation, but that it should be a positive decision, made either by the individual, or, in the case of a sudden, early or unexpected death [as in a child/young person], as long as the deceased has not previously expressed a wish that organs from their body should not be used, then the family should make that decision.
GlynysH
15th Oct 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
Many families don’t even discuss organ donation. My family know I want my organs to go for donation. I also have an organ donation card. I live in Wales so you have to opt out otherwise it’s taken that you want your organs donated. This has increased the amount of organs for donation. I believe why not donate you either get shoved in an oven burnt to ashes or put in the earth to rot. Your organs are no good for you so give them for donation and save someone’s life.
Yodama
17th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
I told my children that I had donated my body for research at Southampton University when I die. The stricken look on my daughters face shocked me, she was terribly upset that I would be cut up and used in this way.
My body may be my body to do with what I will, but sometimes it is hard for the family to deal with.
Jo Kingham
13th Sep 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
I think it should be a case of everyone is a donor unless they opt out. For me it's currently the wrong way round and I would want to do everything I could to help someone else after I've gone. What a gift that is to give someone!
GlynysH
15th Oct 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
That’s what happens in Wales.
dawn62
13th Sep 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
no my family . are not any use . not in close contact
ChrisM76
11th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
No.!! Families should not be allowed to refuse the Donor's wishes made in good faith, whilst still of sound mind.
I would be furious if my family over-ruled my personal choice. After all I won't be using them again.!! And it's the last thing I could do for someone else who would live awhile longer with my help.
LindaH389
11th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
In all cases the wishes of the person should be followed through. I have a friend who is a body donor. She has talked to many about her decision, some for and some against, whether i agree or not i stand by her as its her choice.
linj
10th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
It's been suggested that opt out should be made compulsory instead of opting in. Should this happen overriding a persons wishes would be difficult I would assume.
Alicia
10th Sep 2017
5
Thanks for voting!
No it is my decision and mine alone. Why should other people overrule my decision, they can not change who I leave my money to so why my body.
ecarg
9th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
If you have raised your children to respect you in life surely they will also respect you in death. If reasons and explantions of your choices have been discussed the consent required will surely only be a formality,
However I had never considered the position of relatives whose love ones require an organ but are anti donation.I think they must suffer greatly but commend those who comply with their relatives wishes.
jeanmark
9th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
It was aways so difficult when a patient had made it clear their wish to donate organs. After their death you had to stand by while the relatives refused consent. Some believed you should 'argue' with them, but how could you do that to people grieving.

I was also witness to the terrible dilemma my brother-in-law faced when his 20 year old son died following a road traffic accident. He was for the donor scheme but also knew his son was very anti it. The pain he felt in constantly refusing consent is still with him 17 years later and made worse by 'friends' making it clear they felt he should have ignored his sons wishes. It works both ways.
Woottonm
9th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
I have just read your post and I certainly feel for your brother in law, the friends should have thought twice with their comments.

There is nothing worse than losing or out living your child, I too have lost a son and he wanted to be a donor but due to his illness we were not able to donate his organs, and we would have gone along with his wishes, after all it was his decision and I admire your brother in law doing exactly what his son wanted
jeanmark
10th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
Thank you Woottonm for those kind words.
Angie95
9th Sep 2017
5
Thanks for voting!
No they should not be able to, as it is your body and your wish!
Fruitcake13
8th Sep 2017
6
Thanks for voting!
No, families should not be able to overrule your wishes re organ donation. I'm signed up for full organ donation and have been for many years. I put thought into that decision and I expect my wishes to be respected. If any of my family altered that, I will come back and haunt them!
Rambadt
8th Sep 2017
7
Thanks for voting!
To have already made this commitment you have already thought long and hard that this is what you want to do, your family have no right to try to reverse your decision
VeraS
8th Sep 2017
7
Thanks for voting!
what is the use of carrying a donor card if family can over rule it. They should respect your wishes.
nanabet48
8th Sep 2017
4
Thanks for voting!
I too have had a donor card since the 70's. As far as I am concerned they can have whatever they want that is still of any use.

I have also thought about donating my body to science - not that it is anything special or that I have any illnesses that could be researched, but there is lots of other research they could use it for.

My family all know my wishes and should I decide to donate it to science - after they have taken the bits they need - I may be able to help towards curing other illnesses and diseases as well.

As for the opt out rather than opt in scheme, I am all for it.
GlynysH
15th Oct 2017
0
Thanks for voting!
You cannot donate your body to science if post mortem is carried out.
Woottonm
8th Sep 2017
5
Thanks for voting!
I have had a donor card for years, so its my choice not my next of kin and they should not be allowed to over rule my wishes.

Lionel - thought it was funny - hope they adhere to your wishes !!!
Lionel
8th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
A little humour injected into a morbid subject seldom comes amiss.

But thanks for the compliment. It is appreciated.
Grounded surfer
8th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
Much as voting opportunities are here like this for Organ Donation, with a staggering 91% (as I type) against families over ruling your wishes to donate organs, (or the opposite donating your organs if you didn't want to donate).
The figures of such wishes (91%) to still donate,need to be actioned, either to the decision makers or to Donate Organs, for them to have laws changed to honor peoples wishes to give others another chance through this vital lifeline for others.
I am going to use the opportunity now, to update my wishes on the register. I have told my family that I am on the register, but they might still overrule my decision. That is not right, that ultimately, it is their choice regarding (my) donation.
JanBeynon
8th Sep 2017
5
Thanks for voting!
They don't make decisions for you in life, so why should they be able to in death
scandiman
8th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
No they shouldn't. I'm on the register. My wishes are in my will also. They are my organs and mine to dispose of after death if I wish. I will have no further use for them. Nothing whatsoever to do with my family. I worked for a funeral director and have been tasked with taking a deceased person to the mortuary for organs to be removed in accordance with their wishes. It is all done with the greatest care and respect. It gives another person the gift of life. What more example of loving humanity can there be?
SannyFerrien
7th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
I've been registered for about fifty years; it clutches at my heart when I hear of people dying/being bereaved for want of permission; just think of the ways in which our health and medical training systems have helped so many of us, from penicillin to corneal implants -- I believe we all owe a debt to that service and we should immediately bring in the opt-out system for donations.

In fact, I'm going further, having got the papers to sign my body over to the local university hospital for use in training. My OH is not at ease with my decision - she has a very active visual aspect to her imagination! -- but she, and my sons, all agree to respect my wishes.
Lionel
7th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
I really don't mind what happens to my body after my death. I won't be here to see or care.

I left instructions to my wife and step family to dispose of me in the cheapest and most sanitary way possible.

However, I would like to be left with a vital piece of tooling. Having discovered his usefulness quite young we have been friends ever since. Although the Bible says there is no sex in heaven I'd like to prepared, just in case God changes His mind.
2
Thanks for voting!
Love it Lionel! 😀
Lionel
7th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
Sally, it's a little cheeky but it's how I feel.

Decided to delete the paragraph about the one eyed man in the kingdom of the blind. Didn't think you's pass that!
jeanmark
8th Sep 2017
3
Thanks for voting!
Lionel
8th Sep 2017
1
Thanks for voting!
My next one was a little close to the mark, too close. If it could be withdrawn I would do it.
rickben
7th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
my decision should be allowed
Kes
7th Sep 2017
2
Thanks for voting!
I am on the register. Before I took that step though, I spoke to all my nearest and dearest about it, so that they where aware of it and understood my reasons for doing it. A few of them were already on the register and a few weren't, but all agreed that my wishes would never be overridden.
I would recommend that anyone thinking of doing this now, should do the same.

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